Starting Tomorrow, The Darren Stevenson Exhibition, ‘The Calm Before the Storm’

Image

The Exhibition, starting tomorrow will run for one week until Friday 20th December. With a special appearance from the artist Stevenson between 1pm and 4pm.
A healthy serving of wine and cheese will be on offer (how could you resist?)

We all find inspiration in different places, people and objects and in honour of the exhibition, we thought it would be worthwhile saying a little about the great man who inspired Stevenson and has been a driving force behind his incredible artwork; J. M. W. Turner.

Perhaps best know for his work ‘The Fighting Temeraire’ he had a career that spanned half a century and is regarded by many to be one of the finest British artists to have lived.

Focusing mainly on the destructive forces of man and nature Turner is able to capture beautifully the changing nature of British life. Depicting contrasting scenes of the new industrial landscape against Britain’s past of sail boats and expansive green fields. Reflecting and adding to the efforts of other British Romantics working at the same time such as Wordsworth and Byron.

Like Turner, Stevenson has become entranced by the beauty of the open sea, primarily using coastal scenes in his work often using destructive imagery championed by Turner. A brilliant example of this in action is Stevenson’s ‘Storm’ as featured below.

To see ‘Storm’ and other amazing works, be sure to come along tomorrow or in the week and check out the full exhibit. For more information contact George or Daniel at The Gallery, or find us online.

Image

‘Storm’
Dimensions: 30″ x 30″
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Price: £1150 or just 10 monthly instalments of £115 (interest free)

Advertisements

The Price of Art, are we all just getting a bit carried away?

Image

Only a few weeks ago Wang Jianlin (the richest man in China) was lambasted by his fellow countrymen for spending $28million on a Pablo Picasso. Criticism over the purchase has been widespread in China and for several different reasons covering a whole area of issues political, cultural and ethical. One Chinese blogger asked:

 “With that money, how many sick people could receive treatment? Why not give something back to society first? China’s nouveau riche are short of nothing except conscience.”

Others have protested because Picasso is himself not Chinese and is a country eager to claw back its own national treasures and artwork, this seems like unpatriotic and wasteful act. Indeed it is widely felt in China that the $28 milllion would have been better spent at an auction specialising Chinese works of art and there has been a missed opportunity here. The same applies to upcoming Chinese artists, with groups feeling let down that such a vast amount has now ended up in the West where the auction was held (Christies – New York).

Jianlin’s aides hit back arguing that “Only an enterprise with culture can understand art and collect the best artwork in the world,” and that “Chinese people should be proud rather than focus on how much money was spent.”

Do the Chinese public have a point though? The price of art is booming and the game played by auction houses now seems to be one of merely, “which record can we break next?” Great for investors and sellers, but it doesn’t really seem to capture the real essence of art and threatens to cheapen the cultural impact of the work. Here in the gallery we look to take London art out of the London market with out stipulating the London art market pricing structure. Our prices are set on secondary market sales, artists cost and fluctuating trends and fashions, a set of practices that in my mind should be independently regulated.

 Although having always been a luxury good, the nature and extent of art has changed dramatically over the past few decades. David Zwirner asked “Why do we pay so much for Art?” This is quite a poignant question, with so many other things urgently requiring capital why is so much money plunged into the art market. Maybe the critics of Jianlin have a fair point and it may be time for us to question the larger picture as a whole and insist that these buyers take a more philanthropic approach, diverting funds into community projects and buying art works that benefit the larger cultural and social system whether repatriating art or acquiring works for national galleries and museums.

Music in Art

Image

‘Blustery Daze’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£995 or just £99.50 a month over 10 months (interest free)

It’s often said that a picture contains a thousand words, and it’s true that when looking at a piece the viewer is able to pick out and extrapolate themes and narratives that could perhaps not have been so perfectly expressed with the written word.

Can the same be said for music though? We know the sounds of our favourite tunes and instruments, but it can often be difficult to capture its essence within imagery. The act of listening is perhaps too abstract, preventing painters to fully express music onto canvas.

There are however famous examples of works that do just this. One example may be William Holman Hunt’s, ‘The Awakening Conscience’ picture below.

Image

Here we see a kept Victorian mistress raising from the lap of her married lover having realised the “error of her ways” the image evokes a sense of salvation and hope, but also contains a musical quality. Almost like the backing score to a film, a sense of sound circulates in this image with the sound of image, notice the man’s thumb either compressing or depressing on the piano key. Running alongside this is the idea that her awakening is actually an aftermath of the music played on the piano.

While some painting will contain literal musical connotations like the two above, we must as well not overlook the importance the colour plays. It has been suggested that for many certain sounds conjure up different colours, a D sharp for example could cause the listener to visualise red and because of this the individual would relate the sound to paintings in the same colour. Therefore, different people would have varying musical experience when viewing the same piece regardless of the imagery used within the painting itself.

Other pictures may even really on a particular icon or familiar image to invoke a certain sound or group of songs much like the image of Madonna featured below.

The presence of music within art can often be overlooked and it may be worth taking time out when viewing an image to feel for any music within the piece, not all images will have any, but the ones that do will heighten the experience of viewing artwork and perhaps bring about a new way to look at art.

Image

‘Madonna’ by Nick Holdsworth
Original Artwork: Pixelated Screen print and Spray-paint onto paper (framed)
£895 or 10 monthly instalments of just £89.50 (Interest free)

Exhibition Brochure: Xue Wang

Image

‘Eavesdropping’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 75 x 90cm
£3,245

It’s finally upon us and at long last we can reveal the full line up of the works that will be going on display tomorrow.

Make sure you’re here tomorrow for what will be an outstanding day of frights and thrills.

The gallery will open its doors at 10am and Xue Wang will be here from 1pm to 5pm to tell us about the work, her inspiration and technique.

Exhibition closes Saturday 12th October so make sure you don’t miss out on this breathtaking collection.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact the gallery or to view online click here.

See you tomorrow!!!

Image

‘Feeding Time’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 77 x 80cm
£3,245

Image

‘Vampyres!’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 70 x 75cm
£2,450

Image
‘Speaking in Tongues’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 70 x 75cm
£2,450

Image
‘No Jam Tomorrow’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 70 x 75cm
£2,450

Image
‘Hush’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 75 x 80cm
£3,245

Image
‘The Uninvited Guest’
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 75 x 85cm
£3,245

Image
RSVP
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 80 X 75cm
£2,950

Image
Shadow Play
Oil on Board
Framed Dimensions: 75 x 85cm
£2,950

Upcoming Exhibition by the amazing Xue Wang

‘Feeding Time’

Octobers about to get  a bit scarier.

On 5th October the gallery will be exhibiting work by the talented and brilliant Xue Wang. Her collection entitled ‘Heebie Jeebies’ will be on show featuring some amazing oil paintings that are certain to make you gasp, giggle and hide under your jumpers.

Look above and below for two featured images from the collection, the rest will be unveiled on the 5th for your enjoyment. Xue Wang herself will be available on the day between 1pm and 5pm to answer all your questions. So come long, have a drink and a bit of a fright.

All the works on display will be sold on a first come first serve basis, and because of her popularity works are expected to sell quickly and many have already expressed an interest in purchasing. So make sure you’re there and don’t miss out.

The exhibition of Wang’s work will be on from 5th – 12th October.

If you have any further questions  or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 5th October please do not hesitate the gallery

‘Vampyres!’
Oil on Board
To go on sale 5th October

Xue Wang and the Low-Brow Movement

Feeding Time‘Feeding Time’ by Xue Wang
Oil on Canvas
On Sale 5th October

As many of you may now well be aware we have an upcoming exhibit ‘Heebie-Jeebies’  from the fantastically whimsical Xue Wang on the 5th October 2013. Born in 1980, the year of the mischievous monkey Wang grew up in Northern China before coming to the UK to do an MA and finally setting up her studio in London.  Wang gets much of her inspiration from childhood paraphernalia: Dolls, toys, stage sets and compliments them with the cultural heritage of Victoriana, Vintage Fashion and pin-up imagery. Her overall artistic style and finished pieces visually represent the Low Bow Movement to a tee.

So what is low-brow? What does it aim to achieve and how did it come about? Hopefully we can answer some of these questions for you!!!

dejame descansar‘Dolce Condena’ by Sara Sanz
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 22 “x 26”
£1,250 or £125 a month for 10 months on the own art scheme (No Deposit)

So how did low brow come about?
The term low brow art came about in 1979 when after many attempts the artist Robert Williams finally received news that a publisher was willing to produce a book containing his works. Williams gave the book the self-deprecating name of ‘The Low-Brow Art of Robert Williams’ since no authorized art institution would recognize his type of art. Low-Brow was therefore used by Williams in opposition to highbrow, established movements. He said the name then stuck, even though he feels it is inappropriate. It is now used across the globe by hundreds of artists and has become a movement in its own right.

What is Low Brow?
Williams Describes the movement as “cartoon-tainted abstract surrealism.” Lately, Williams has begun referring to his own work as “Conceptual Realism.  In the UK this work along with Low Brow has probably best described by many as Pop Surrealism, this harks back to the underground scene that helped create the movement involving Williams and Mark Ryden  both based on the US West Coast. Low-Brow takes inspiration from comic material, film iconography, pop culture and cult magazines to create a tongue in cheek painting that pokes fun at mainstream art culture. Low-Brow work tends to have a dark underbelly that can sometimes be shocking and provocative, but each piece always has a comical and narrative side. Much like Xue Wang’s ‘Prime Cuts’, which features a sinister pig chopping up a human lady. The painting is actually an artistic analysis of the recent horse meat scandal; the shocking image perfectly mirrors the nation’s disgust to the meat scandal.

NKK - The Assistant‘The Assistant’ by Nom Kinnear King
Oil on Board
Dimensions: 72″ x 23″
£995 or £99.50 a month for 10 months on the own art scheme (No Deposit)

The movement although around now for about 40 years has only really begun to take off in the UK despite extraordinary success in the USA and Australia. The UK consumer art market is notorious for arriving late to upcoming art movements; Picasso was looked down on here when his works first started to circulate resulting in vast collections being bought up overseas whilst the UK had and still has very little to show for by the artist. In the case of Low-Brow this is a really shame since three of the movements up and coming artists and based in the UK; Xue Wang, Sara Sanz and Nom Kinnear King.