New Works from Rachel Tighe

It’s a new week and the gallery is very excited to welcome a new artist, Rachel Tighe.

Rachel Tighe focuses on creating lively street scenes and cityscape’s, using a bright variety of colours and bold lines.These vibrant colours clash with everyday life exuding all the sights, sounds and emotions generated by the atmosphere and aura of these great cities. 
Tighe develops her works by first sketching onto canvass, either from standing or pictures, then paints over to create a vibrant finish.

Take a look at these images of her original work below.

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‘New York Taxi View’ by Rachel Tighe
 Dimensions: 36″ x 24″ cm
Original Artwork: Acrylic onto Stretched Box Canvas
Price: £795.00 or 10 monthly installments of only £79.50 (No Deposit)

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‘New York Bench’ by Rachel Tighe
Dimensions: 24″ x 36″ cm
Original Artwork: Acrylic onto Stretched Box Canvas
Price: £795.00 or 10 monthly installments of only £79.50 (No Deposit)

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Times Square Roads’ by Rachel Tighe
 Dimensions 36″ x 24″ cm
Original Artwork: Acrylic onto Stretched Box Canvas
Price: £795.00 or 10 monthly installments of only £79.50 (No Deposit)

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‘Manchester Crossing’ by Rachel Tighe
 Dimesnions: 24″ x 36″ cm
Original Artwork: Acrylic onto Stretched Box Canvas
Price: £795.00 or 10 monthly installments of only £79.50 (No Deposit)

Any questions, please feel free to contact the gallery.

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New works by Ed Chapman and introducing Tom Lewis

 

 It’s an exciting week here at the George Thornton Art! We’ve had new stone mosaic works from Ed Chapman, and we are welcoming a new artist to the gallery this week. Tom Lewis, a groundbreaking artist from London, he uses narrative in all his paintings to convey a different story from frame to frame. These stories are often centred around familiar characters and themes.

Check out pictures of both their work below.

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David Bowie by Ed Chapman
Stone Mosaic on Board
Dimensions: 25 x 33cm
Price: £3,250 (Payment options available)

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John Lennon by Ed Chapman
Stone Mosaic on Board
Dimensions: 24 x 33cm
Price: £3,250 (Payment options avaliable)

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The secret song of Christopher Shakespeare by Tom Lewis
Original Artwork: Mixed Media onto Board (framed)
Dimensions: 26 x 24cm
Price: £2,500

Lewis’s iconic pink Burobbu can be seen sitting on the shoulders of a lone man. The Burobbu are creatures from another world, and a creation of Lewis’s imagination.

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Lord Samuel Winterbottom is a Very Desperate Man by Tom Lewis
Original Artwork: Acrylic, Aerosol & Pen onto Board (framed)
Dimensions: 24 x 26cm
Price: £1,900 or 10 monthly installments of £190 (interest free, no deposit)

Here the mind of Lord Samuel Winterbottom is being controlled by the mysterious creatures in the foreground.

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Maria and Flo sing Offenbach by Tom Lewis
Original Artwork: Acrylic, Aerosol & Pen onto Board (framed)
Dimensions: 24 x 26cm
Price: £2,250
These mystical singing octupi come and go as they please. 

Growth of internet sales increases the possibility of art fraud!

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We all love a bargain, and where better to find something at a discounted rate than the web, but when it comes to buying art online should consumers be far more cautious about the bargains on offer to them? The ‘New York Times’ recently pointed out the disproportionate amount of cheap originals from old masters such as Picasso and  Rembrandt, some selling for as little as $900 (that’s around £580 to us Brits). Those knowledgeable about the price such works usually sell for will immediately feel dubious and perhaps question the legitimacy of such works to great lengths before adding it to ones basket. However the number of consumers being duped into buying these bargain masters is on the rise and looks set to grow further unless something is done soon, either in policing these fraudulent sites or trying to educate those looking to buy art.

At the moment Policing online art markets is something of a problem area.  An online article by ’The Art Newspaper’ highlights perfectly some of the issues faced, particularly regarding whether or not sellers acted dishonestly when advertising art for sale:

‘Attempting to prove that the seller intended to deceive bidders is made more difficult by the fact that many online descriptions of works (including legitimate ones) are vague. More evidence would be needed in a situation where a piece was described as “signed by Picasso”, for example, rather than “by Picasso”

Such vague admissions allow a lot of scope for sellers to give true sounding accounts of pictures and prints for sale that may not ultimately meet consumer expectations.
A prime example of this would be a scam orchestrated by a pair on eBay who sold around £57,000 worth of Banksy prints that they purported to be legitimate. This is a particular interesting case as Banksy’s have been known to appear online and can be traded legitimately using ‘Pest Control’, a group that authenticate the sale of Banksy’s. In the past we have used ‘Pest Control’ when buying and selling works by the artist.

(If you are interested in buying a Banksy I can (and have) sourced signed limited editions for customers. Fully authenticated obviously…. Please contact the gallery for more information)

As with anything there will be winners and losses, the web has allowed plenty of young budding artists, small galleries and previously reluctant buyers the chance and opportunity to sell to and buy from a much broader range than was possible in the past. This boost to the industry should not be outweighed and forgotten by those wanting to taint the system.

For those who do buy online whether from eBay, a registered site or an online auction, just remember to do your homework, especially if they selling something as ‘original’. There would be nothing worse than buying something you think is unique, only to discover it’s been hanging in the British Museum for the past 60 years. Ask the sellers for provenance, such as a certificate of authenticity, but even then don’t fall complacent, these to can be forged. Lastly remember that although the web can from time to time offer us a bargain, just keep in mind that if something seems to good to be true, then the likelihood (especially when it comes to the old masters) is that it probably is.

If you have any questions or queries please feel free to contact the gallery and I will be happy to help.

Is Art an Asset Class?

I don’t want you to think that I am changing my mind about the investment value of art.  According to artnetmarketing.com the demand for the top-selling artists has remained consistently high and done better than most investment classes consistently over the last ten years.

During the last week I was asked by a trustee to explain the asset value of some works of art in an estate.  The key criteria for establishing an asset is that the price is set efficiently.  This requires an effective method of aggregating opinions into a price as is done on the stock market.  In the art market a very small group of people set the price.  Also a painting is only sold once in about 20 years.  Also it is not clear that value sets the price.  If art is sold at auction there are buyer and seller premiums that inflate the price paid.

So my answer to the trustee was: art is a wealth store.  It does not pay dividends or interest and can cost money to keep, such as insurance or cleaning.   But for those artists whose work is desired the tax free capital gain has historically been large.

Economists and financiers do have a soul and many of them are collectors not just because of the monetary gain but also because as humans we are natural collectors of things of beauty that up lift our spirits.  Art is probably top of the list of items that full fill this need as we live in our urban landscape.

So collect your art as a wealth store and enjoy it.