Fresh New Works In This Week.

We have some fantastic new works in the gallery. Check out some of these featured pieces below.

Don’t hesitate to contact the gallery for more information and as always, feel free to view even more works on our website.

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This stunning original (now also available as a print) is created by painting text onto canvas. The size, colour and length of each word is carefully chosen in order to construct a lifelike image of Edward’s subject,in this instance; Bridget Bardot. The finished result is truly astonishing to see, from a far it could simply be taken on face value as a portrait but as you advance the image opens itself up to a whole new viewing experience. 

Would you believe 5,000 individual letters painted (astonishingly) 4 times each…. remarkable!

“Bardot La Caresse” by Mike Edwards
Oil onto Stretched Box Canvas
Dimensions:47″ x 63″
Price: £4,450 or 18 monthly installments of just £248 (interest free)

Signed Limited Edition Print
Dimensions: 40″ x 32″
Price: £495 or 10 monthly installments of just £49.50 (interest free)

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Using Turner for inspiration. Stevenson creates mesmerizing sea scenes similar to those created by Turner. He is able to really capture the essence and nature of the ever changing moods of the sea.

“Barnstaple Estuary” by Darren Stevenson
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 33″ x 22″
Price: £795 or 10 monthly installments of only 79.50 (interest free)

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This electric piece is produced using a wonderful spray techinue that really lifts the colour and creates a surreal landscape unlike any other that could be created using more convential materials.
This particular work in blue, has such a presense and really darws the viewer into the piece.

Original Artwork: “Entelechy Blue” by  Russell Hatton
Xyrallic and Candy on Aluminium
Dimensions: 54″ x 34″
Price: £3000 or 18 monthly installments of just £167 (interest free)

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This wonderful piece has been 4 years in the making. Since being dreamt up by the artist this piece has been a labour of love.
The work is full of allegorical meaning and depsite its obviously religious connotations, it is only loosely based on the Christian image it conjures. Instead this piece is about the sharing of laughter, truth, humour, struggle, love and betrayal that is ever present within a community.

“The Apostles” by Mackenzie Thorpe
Signed Limited Edition; Hand Painted Resin Sculpture
Dimensions: 31″ x 11″
Price: £2000 or 10 monthly installments of only £200 (interest free)

Any questions regarding the work please don’t hesitate to contact the gallery – +44(0)1159243555 or george@georgethorntonart.com

Is Britain F**ked?

In a recent interview with the Guardian Anish Kapoor lamented Britain’s poor attitude to the arts. Kapoor put forward:

“In the UK, while the arts are the second biggest sector after banking, they probably form less than one tenth of 1% of government spending. It’s completely scuzzy. The UK has two things, the arts and education, and both of them it pushes into the corner. It’s the hugest, hugest mistake. Why do British ministers meet anyone from the arts other than to cut them? Compared to Germany, Britain has got quite a long way to go there, frankly:

In short, Britain’s f**ked.”

The artist has recently opened his new exhibition in the German capital, ‘Kapoor in Berlin’. It is biggest and according the artist, it’s also his best to date. This he believed is in response to the Germans much healthier, positive and respectful approach to art.

Are things really as bleak as Kapoor believes though?

I suppose this all depends on whichever economic train of thought you belong to, and how best to stimulate creative activity.

On one hand, creativity costs. It is difficult for artists to maintain high calibre works of art, pay for exhibitions and get there name into the spotlight. Likewise, training in arts such as funding to schools and colleges in order to improve courses and teaching require investment from the state. On a larger scale, it is also costly to return works and draw in world class collections to the nation’s museums and galleries.

The coalition cut art spending by a massive 29% when they came to power, this has had lasting effect. We must take into account though that cuts are being made across the board and there are those who strongly believe arts funding should be cut entirely in favour of other areas. It hasn’t all been bad though, here at the gallery we were accepted into a government run scheme ‘Own Art’. This scheme allows the gallery to offer interest free credit to customers for works under £2000, this has only recently been increased to £15,000 due to the relationship with arts council funding. A positive for the gallery, its artists and the economy.

The other side of this though, is that because of the small amount of funds and help that is on offer. It could be said that money is not wasted, and only the very best artists come to the front. Those with the passion, drive and talent will ultimately (hopefully) be recognised and acknowledged.

It has been put forward that teaching art en mass could actually be detrimental to the creativity of the nation. The rather loose and fluid way art is taught early on in schools can actually be helpful in developing creative and unique ideas that go on to be positively harnessed and perfected during further education. This is in comparison to a structured way of teaching that may instead create of wave of artists whose techniques are built on a strict and rigid model.

‘Houghton Hall’

Likewise, where the state has cut, private enterprise has helped to fill the gap. BP recently played a huge role in sponsoring and helping bring back a vast collection to an exhibition at Houghton Hall, which was sold to Russia.

Kapoor may a point, and funding is essential to the creative industry. This bleak and negative view is however perhaps too much of an exaggeration. Britain is by no means fucked and what happens here does matter and is picked up both locally and internationally.

Something that I hope is set to continue.

New For May

Hello All,

We have a few exciting updates for you this month.

First, the Gallery is excited to announce that we at long last have some new pieces in by the wonderfully bizarre Xue Wang. Wang’s work has been exhibited extensively across the globe and has been particularly successful in the USA. Wang’s art never fails to stimulate discussion and arouse attention, so don’t miss out.

Secondly, we are excited to announce that the gallery’s next exhibition will be at the end of this month, featuring the works of Paul Lemmon. The exhibition will run for one week, beginning on Saturday 22nd June. Lemmon will be in the gallery between 1pm and 5pm to discuss his work and answer any questions you may have for him.

Thirdly, the gallery is now able (well, from the 20Th May) to offer up to £15,000 interest free on all our original pieces. So that original piece you’ve been pining after, but was just a bit too much is now well within your grasp.

Check out featured pieces by Xue Wang, Paul Lemmon and others below.

For more information, please contact the gallery for details.

‘Womb Service’ by Xue Wang
Original Art: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 29″ x 31.5″
Price: £2950 or 18 monthly installments of £164 (interest free)

In this piece Wang sets out to create a moment of disbelief and shock at a suprise party. This almost doll like figure, walks into the room presenting her bulging womb that is ready to blow (notice the three babies holding the sparkler, ready to ignite. The result being a confetti-esque shower of babies over the party crowd, much to the enjoyment of the two cheeky clowns)

‘Above Manhattan at Night’ by Alicia Dubnycjk
Original Art: Gloss on Wood
Dimensions: 51″ x 29″
Price: £3950 or 18 monthly installments of only £219.50 (interest free)

This dynamic and electric piece by Dubnycjk, captures the restlessness of the ‘city that never sleeps’ beautifully. You can almost feel the energy rushing through New Yorks gridded road system and up into the offices an apartments of this great city.

‘Eva Damson’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Art: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 22.5″ x 22.5″

Price: £995 or 10 monthly installments of only £95.50 (interest free)

Kinnear King is a master of portraiture. This surreal character looks as though she has been plucked straight out of a bleak victorian novel. Her clever use of light to convey the characters she paints is  plain to see in this wonderful piece, her pale face is so carefully offset by the dark mass of hair that sits so elegantly above.

‘Tribute to Turner’ by Darren Stevenson
Original Art: Oil on Board
Dimensions:33″ x 22″
Price: £795 or 10 monthly installments of only £79.50 (interest free)

Stevenson has gained much of his inspiration from the paintings of Turner. He uses very similar techniques to create the effect of his paintings. Like Turner, Stevenson is able to capture the essense and fragility of nature. Stevenson pays tribute to this great master in this piece and makes a nod to the painter by painting the shapes of fish into the piece, a signature tactic used by Turner in his later works.

‘Change My Mind’ by Paul Lemmon
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
Price: £1850 or 10 monthly instalments of only £185 (interest free)

Lemmon’s work has the ability to grab a viewers attention isntantly. His works draw you into the scene and the mystery that they create. Lemmon gives you just enough imformation to understand what is happening, but leaves the viewer to fill in the blanks creating questions in the viewers mind: Who is this girl? Where is she? What is she talking about?

Don’t miss the Paul Lemmon exhibition: 22nd June – 3rd July
Meet the artist: 22nd June (1pm – 5 pm)

The Problem With Provenance

When buying artwork we all like to know the provenance of the piece. Who made it, is it a new piece and if not who owned it beforehand?
Having read an article in the art review this week, it got me thinking just how important it is to make sure you know about a pieces provenance before agreeing to buy it. Here is a little example of how provenance could affect you…

Not knowing the provenance can be a terrible business. Recently Steven Brooks, an art collector from California attempted to sell a piece entitled ‘Allegorical Portrait of a Lady as Diana Wounded by Cupid’ by Van Loo (featured below). Brooks however came unstuck when Christie’s refused to sell the piece after doing a bit of research into the painting. They discovered that the piece was once owned by the Nazi war criminal Hermann Goering. This has simply rendered the painting worthless as it is now presumed Nazi loot and has put a cloud on the title. Brooks is now in the process of trying to sue Sotheby’s for not doing enough to research the paintings past in the first place. He bought the painting in 2004 from the auction for £57,600 and had no idea of it’s Nazi past. So far,no rightful claimants have been identified and non have come forward. If this remains to be the case, it is unclear what will become of the piece, its past makes it unsellable until it can either be proved Goering purchased the painting legitimately, restoring the line of title or the rightful owner identified. Either way, Brooks is certainly likely to loose out.

This may not however be the end of the road for ‘Allegorical Portrait of a Lady as Diana Wounded by Cupid’. Although it may be of no use to Brook’s,should the rightful owners of the piece be found and the painting returned, then its value could increase exponentially. This was true of the Gustav Klimt’s ‘Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I’, despitelooted by the Nazi’s, the piece was eventually restored to the rightful owners following a grueling court battle. The story captured the headlines at the time and the painting became iconic and culminated with it being sold for a record amount when put up by the new owner. Another famous example of this is Mark Rothko’s ‘White Center (Yellow, Pink and Lavender on Rose)’, this is another piece that can be found on the worlds most expensive painting list, selling for a staggering 72.8 million dollars. This price would arguably had never been reached at the time, were not for Rockefeller (featured above with picture) being its prior owner. Rockefeller’s ownership of the painting has become so synonymous with the painting that it is now popularly referred to as the ‘Rockefeller Rothko’.

Provenance therefore isn’t just a past, but also a story. One which can have either a positive or negative effect on the art it uses to tell it.
Provenance is important and it shouldn’t be ignored. It usually only requires a small amount of research and doing it should could either save you money or unravel an exciting and interesting past that could even increase the pieces worth. The provenance of new original pieces may just be a receipt to begin with, but its how that work is used, wheres and it hung and who owns it in the future.