“Debbie Harry, Blondie” – Commission Request

This piece was commissioned by one of my clients. Created by Mike Edwards, tirelessly painting each individual letter by hand. Note the subtle cheek bones and attention to detail. Incredible work! For all commission request contact the gallery – +44(0)1159243555 – george@georgethorntonart.com

The Price of Art

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Here at the gallery we pride ourselves on signing up the best artists and selling their works at a reasonable and affordable price. We put talent first, out customers know that and it’s why they come back again and again. The same may however not be true for the art market at large. In a recent interview American artist Eric Fischl spoke of his disappointment at the way:  
 
“The price tag has replaced it [talent], and it’s certainly not a critical dialogue. It’s just something that’s a symbolic thing where it must mean the person who sells for the most money is the best artist. It’s a total false kind of critical economy and very destructive to the culture as well.”
 
This is a disconcerting trend although not one new to the world of luxury goods and not a trend which is entirely alien to myself either. We are all susceptible to snobbery of certain kinds and I think a lot of us do have an in built perception that quality equates to price. I personally pay through the nose for expensive meats and cheese purely on the basis that I wholeheartedly believe (with no real tangible proof) that paying more will mean I am getting a better product than the same cheese half the price in own brand packaging. Experience has taught me that this is often untrue, one bag of mozzarella bags is quite often exactly the same as another and yet I still go for the option. 
 
Price is still an important indicator though, it just shouldn’t be the only one as Fishcl indicates it has become. Price should reflect talent, ingenuity and experience rather than what is de rigueur that month, which will inevitably lead to a fickle and fluctuating art market. Collectors and those who hold themselves out as connoisseurs must to be willing to look past price and appreciate works that are perhaps under priced to help promising artists get off the ground and promote new talent.     
 
Just remember that the most important thing when buying art is that you love the piece you’re getting.
 
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Red is the Colour of Money when it comes to Selling Art

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So why is this? Red notably has been the concept of danger, stopping for traffic signals or the colour of the fire alarm. Red lips are considered beautiful and in turn Red is the signal of sex! The red light district needs no explanation! Red is the warmest of all colours. Red is the colour most chosen by extroverts. In China, red is the colour of prosperity and joy. So does red in paintings turn us on?

See Rothko’s ‘Untitled 1970’ with its thick splash of red across the top. One of the primary colours and in Rothko’s own words ‘red is the colour of blood, tomatoes and the occasional apple’.

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Sotheby’s art expert Philip Hook (said) the colour red – sells…’Artistic genius and masterful brushwork are all very well, but for a painting to fetch the highest prices it needs to have a splash of red’…”

Kate Brinkworth ‘s incredible detailed work is sensual and moody. Red backdrops allow the viewer to feel a sense of danger however they are lost in the beauty of the work. The fine brush work and incredible reflective quality detracts from the danger of the colour and lightens the mood.

Under physiological research red has been shown to increase blood pressure and stimulate the adrenal glands. The stimulation of the adrenal glands helps us become strong and increases our stamina. Pink, a lighter shade of red, helps muscles relax. So with this in mind do red paintings inflict us to be dominant when it comes to decision making. Would it empower anyone enough to buy a piece of art work?

World renowned artist, Mackenzie Thorpe smacks the paper with a handful of red pastel chalk to create his latest piece. ‘In Dad’s Boots’ is large, the whole work measures almost 40” sq and priced at £9,950. The red football give the whole piece a focal point without distracting from the initial child like emotion of the boy looking up at his father.

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So, if we take into account red is both gory and sensual. I suppose the artist trick is to land of the side of sensual indication. Let’s say for example this is what helps sell a work of art? As Mackenzie has portrayed so well let’s look at bridging the gap between portraying a statement of danger to that of lust and mood. An almost erotic tendency that makes the viewer feel good and releases endorphins. So it is entirely plausible that the colour red does sell art.

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New in For July

Check out some of our amazing new works in for July from the amazing Gail Troth, Russell Hatton and a special one off we’ve managed to get our hands on from Banksy.

Browse featured works by the artists below.

Don’t forget that the Ian Hodgson Show is still running and finishes tomorrow. Make sure you don’t miss out and get down to the Gallery so you can enjoy this outstanding exhibition.

For more details check out our website or contact us at the gallery available in house, by phone and email. Ask for George or Daniel.

Works by Banksy

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Nola (White Rain)
Signed Gift Graphic on Paper (Framed)
29.5″ x 38.5″
£4950 or just 18 monthly installments of £275

This is a unique piece that was originally gifted to Banky’s scaffolder, the man who sets up the platforms on which Banksy is able to create his works. We have a letter certifying the authenticity of the piece from Pest Control (The group that authenticate Banksy’s).

Works by Gail Troth

Troth’s works are created without her even touching the canvas. Done by dripping oil onto canvas using various tactics to manipulate the paint as it falls.

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‘Surreal View’
Oil on Canvas
39.5″ x 19″
£995 or just 10 monthly installments of £99.50Image
‘Eternal Landscape in Blue’
Oil on Canvas
47″ x 15.5″
£995 or just 10 monthly installments of £99.50

Works by Russell Hatton

Working with aluminium and an array of pulley systems. Hatton is able to create these truly inspiring landscapes and abstract visuals.

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‘Entelechy Verde’
Oil on Canvas
54″ x 34″
£3000 or just 14 monthly installments of £214Image

‘Into the Blue’
Oil on Canvas
54″ x 34″
£3000 or just 14 monthly installments of £214

The Ian Hodgson Exhibition (Saturday 13th July – Saturday 20th July)

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The Rise of Women

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Picture from Tracey Emin’s show: ‘She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea’

After centuries of being regarded as second class to men, it seems that finally the tables have turned and that women are no longer merely enjoying a sense of equality in areas, but are developing their own niches with women only floors in hotels, night clubs and gyms . So why is it that women still seem to lag behind in the art world, even today, the works of female artists seem to reach only a tenth of their male counterparts. Tracey Emin and Damian Hirst arguably share similar status and dominance in today’s art market, yet Hirst’s pieces carry much larger price tags.  

It was once taught and thought that women played no role in the history of art, something that Dana Arnold picked up on during her studies at UCLA. Since leaving her research has focused on the ways in which, art history is interpreted and the roles women have played. The truth simply is that the role of women has to one degree or another simply been ignored. As in other areas, the annuals of history and the rules of what makes a masterpiece was laid out by men for the benefit of men leaving little room for women.   

Despite histories ignorance women have been present and have played an important role. The Bayeux Tapestry was created by nuns, the Early Renaissance saw the arrival of named female artists such as Lavinia Fontana and Sofonisba Anguisciola, before being ousted in the latter stages of the movement. It was women who hand painted the Wedgewood vases and porcelain that is so highly regarded today. In fact their role and contribution to the popular culture of their time arguably outstrips that of males in the same period. Indeed, it is only due to their ostracism from high culture that they were deemed academically irrelevant for so long.       

This began to chance when in the 20th century, a surge of innovation and discovery questioned traditional views and the perception of women artists. Women made further gains, such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Louise Bourgeois, Camille Claudel, Sonia Delaunay, Laura Knight, Zinaida Serebriakova, Tamara de Lempicka and Natalia Goncharova. Culminating with Rachel Whiteread becoming the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993.

 

As our culture continues to embrace the role of women, the once held firm beliefs of women’s role within art are set to change. At the gallery we have already noticed a shift in this direction with 2 of top selling artists being women, Xue Wang and Gail Troth. With more interest and attention being paid to female artists than ever before, it seems likely that the value of both old and new works by female artists is set to rise.  

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‘Eternal Landscape in Blue’ by Gail Troth
Oil on Canvas
47″ x 15.5″
£995 or 10 monthly installments of just £99.50

Exhibition: The Works of Ian Hodgson

George Thornton Art proudly presents a solo exhibition with the critically acclaimed artists Ian Hodgson.

We would like to invite you to come and view Hodgsons amazing work in the Gallery between Saturday 13th July and Saturday 20th July. Hodgson himself will be in the gallery on Saturday 13th between 1pm and 4pm to answer any questions you may have and to talk about his work first hand.

Hodgson’s unique style and instantly recognisable content has given him critical acclaim all over the country. Famous for his depiction of the male body, fingerprints, mirror balls, plus his portray of architecture has allowed him an almost celebrity status within the south east.

Creating his work by manipulating pastel on paper, strategically scoring on the back allows him to blend charcoal and bring the whole piece together.

These figurative and urban creations have generated much acclaim for Hodgson whose work has been commisioned for album covers and even for the tins of Derwent Pencils.

This will be the Gallery’s third exhibition by the artist and we hope you can come along and take part in what will be an amazing show.

Check out some feautred pieces from the show below.

For more information please contact the gallery either by email or phone.

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‘Feathers and wax’ by Ian Hodgson
Graphite onto Paper
Dimensions: 34″ x 28.5″
Price:
£695 or 10 monthly installments of just £69.50

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‘Egress’ by Ian Hodgson
Graphite onto Board
Dimensions: 8″ x 8″
Price: £135

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‘Urbanscope’ by Ian Hodgson
Graphite onto Paper
Dimensions: 34″ x 28.5″
Price:
£695 or 10 monthly installments of just £69.50

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‘Once I Had Love’ by Ian Hodgson
Graphite onto Paper
Dimensions: 27.5″ x 27.5″
Price:
£495 or 10 monthly installments of just £49.50