The Art off Kate Brinkworth

Kate Brinkworth’s painting stems from her curiosity in films, particularly those directed by or in the style of Hitchcock. She is particularly inspired by effects created though experimentation with focus, and repeatedly photographs her still lifes with various shutter speeds, camera angles and lighting to find the optimum composition. Brinkworth’s style uses the language of film, advertising and photography to create these unique images; her visits to Las Vegas have developed her interest in the representation of objects associated with vice. Painted in varying degrees of focus, her expert technique deceives the viewer into believing the work is a photograph, due to the realism of her subject matter and style, and the thin application of paint which gives a smooth, glossy finish. It is only on closer inspection that the viewer realises the work is entirely painted by hand.

coke_bottles_2_-_oil_on_canvas__165cm_x_110cm

‘Cola Bottles’

This particular piece was actually acquired from the artist personal collection. It was painted as a pair, this she kept where as the other painting sold through Christies auction house, January 2014 for almost £9,000.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/paintings/kate-brinkworth-tall-coke-5762480-details.aspx

Brinkworth’s works challenge our perceptions of the image; in our contemporary world inundated with visual stimuli, she painstakingly labours over her compositions to make us look at these familiar objects in a new way. In a parallel challenge to contemporary conventions her technique mirrors the Renaissance mural technique of the ‘cartoon’, a drawing which would be pricked along the lines and dusted with charcoal to transfer the skeleton of the image to the wall. Brinkworth similarly maps out her photographs onto both sides of sheets of paper and rubs the reverse to move the image onto the canvas. Once the composition is mapped out, she begins working into the picture in oil using her distinctive technique.

The Call

‘The Call’

Original Artwork: pencil on paper, mounted and framed.

To view these works and many more by this incredibly talented artist do contact the gallery {george@georgethorntonart.com} or pop into the gallery, 12a, Flying Horse walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159 243 555.

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On this day… 1981, Picasso’s “Guernica” was returned to Spain.

On September 10, 1981, Artist Pablo Picasso’s monumental anti-war mural “Guernica” was returned to Spain after four decades of refugee existence. One of my favourite pieces, the painting was inspired by the destruction of the Basque town of Guernica by the Nazi’s during the Spanish Civil War.

picasso-guernica

Picasso working on his “Guernica”

At the time, Picasso was working in Paris. On hearing the news of devastation and destruction upon this city, he painted arguably one of the most famous paintings in the world ever! It shows the tragedies of war and the suffering it inflicts upon individuals, particularly innocent civilians.

In 1939, Picasso gave the painting to New York’s Museum of Modern Art on an extended loan and decreed that it not be returned to Spain until democratic liberties were restored, eventually returning to Spain in 1981–eight years after Picasso’s death. The work now hangs in Madrid at the Reina Sofia, Museum of Art.

picassoguernica

“Guernica”

Peggy and her collection…

The Guggenheim in New York is probably one of the most famous Art Museums in the world today. Not only for its collection of modern art but also it architectural design! The Guggenheim family were wealthy Americans originally from Germany. Although it was Solomon who set up the foundation, gallery space and subsequent museum it was actually his niece, Peggy that helped to establish the modern contemporary collection we know today. Peggy, although a ferocious purchaser of modern art is slightly lesser know than her Uncle, for obvious reasons however here in the gallery we like to highlight a prominent period of her life.

Peggy Guggenheim is one of the most amazing, amusing and courageous figures in Modern Art. Much married, with an impressive string of lovers, she began collecting surrealist works from a relatively early age.

peggy-guggenheim

Peggy used to say that it was her duty to protect the art of her own time, and she dedicated half of her life to this mission. As a young woman  she worked at the ‘Sun Wise Turn’ bookshop in New York and became involved in New York’s intellectual and artistic circles. In 1921 Peggy Guggenheim travelled to Europe, and soon found herself at the heart of Parisian bohemia and American expatriate society.
 
In 1937, Peggy decided to open an art gallery in London. The opening of the “Guggenheim Jeune” gallery in January 1938 marked the beginning of a career that would significantly affect the course of post war art. The gallery never made money, however Peggy continued to purchase contemporary pieces and investing her time into opening museum spaces in London, Paris and later Venice.
 
In the midst of World War II, she fled back to New York. On her return she set up a museum housing much of her collection cubist, abstract, and Surrealist art. Here she exhibited work by (then) relatively unknown artists’ such as Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and David Hare. She continued inspiring artists to paint and think differently, allowing them freedom to exhibit and encouraging the public to embrace modern contemporary art! After a few years she returned to Europe, opening a gallery space  in Venice and highlighting Pollock and Rothko giving them their first taste of European exposure together with works by Picasso and Dali.
 
Towards the late 1960’s Peggy was invited to showcase her collection at her Uncle’s Museum. Her uncle, Solomon had established  the “Solomon Foundation” museum after the war although at the time mainly displayed  early impressionistic work. Peggy’s collection was well received and as a result has grown to become one of the finest bodies of work in the world highlighting the gallery of the same name.

From one fine collection to another… Here in the gallery we are proud to represent modern works from all over the world. The only space in Nottingham dealing with original, contemporary pieces. Do visit us on line or pop in to see the complete collection.

www.georgethorntonart.com

 

EXHIBITION – 23rd – 30th AUGUST: Nottingham artist Darren Stevenson looks at Nottingham artist Richard Parkes Bonington

Nottingham artist Darren Stevenson looks at Nottingham artist Richard Parkes Bonington.

As we set up for our Summer exhibition with Nottingham artist Darren Stevenson we feel we should compose a short note on one of his hero’s. We all find inspiration in different places, people and objects and in this case we’d like to pay homage to another Nottingham artist; Richard Parkes Bonington. Actually both artists grew up in Arnold, a small market town and suburb of Nottingham although there childhood playgrounds are not the only aspect they share in common. Both artists treat the canvas in the same way, layering of oils and continuously working to produce the perfect spectrum of light in every painting. Below is a little detail pertaining to Darren’s inspirational artist.

Richard Parkes Bonington, Scène sur la côte, PicardieRichard Parkes Bonington, “Scène sur la côte, Picardie”

Richard Parkes Bonington has been considered as one of the most influential artist of his day albeit his notoriety was not fully appreciated until after his early death, where he contracted tuberculosis and died at the age of 26.

Similar in regards to our very own Darren Stevenson, Bonington mostly painted coastal scenes, with low horizons and large commandeering skies, showing a brilliant handling of light and atmosphere.

Although born in Nottingham, Bonington as a young man travelled to France where his father set up a lace shop. Here he shared studios and exhibited with highly collectable artist such as Constable. It was here Bonington started to look closely at historical art and developed a unique technique mixing watercolour with Gouache and gum, achieving an effect close to oil paintings.

Unlike many artists of his time , Bonington would rather paint life with colour and vigour. Not dwelling on the difficulties and struggle of the early 1800’s. Some claim this affected his notoriety whilst alive but certainly today we remember him as a distinct draftsman, a gifted artisan of light and atmospheric seascapes with notable works hanging all over the world including a number in the prestigious ‘Wallace’ and ‘Tate’ collections.

Our Nottingham artist Darren Stevenson’s solo show commences 23rd – 30th August. You are welcome to come and visit the collection any time during that week and if you so wish, meet Darren on the closing day between 1pm and 4pm. For more information do contact the gallery – (01159) 243 555 – george@georgethorntonart.com

Low Tide, St Just

Original Oil on Board by Darren Stevenson ” Low Tide, St Just (Cornwall)

Regal Water (Carrick Roads)

Original Oil on Board by Darren Stevenson “Regal Waters”

 

Art and Rolf. What happens to the value of his prints and originals now?

Over the past few weeks I have received many e-mails and calls regarding the value of his art, prints and original works. It’s been a good ten months since the allegations were first printed in the press and as we hear the news that Rolf has been sentenced to five years and nine months. Here are my thoughts on the situation and hopefully an answer to some of your questions.

I know many people have purchased prints and originals by Rolf. There are probably over 100,000 limited editions in circulation and its probably safe to say that up until this time last year everyone that owned a piece actually admired Rolf impressionistic technique plus his ability to replicate old masters.

The fact many of us sited him as a ‘national treasure’ makes it much harder to believe what he has been convicted of. Now we all probably view his work (in our homes) and in galleries somewhat differently.

So what does this mean with regards his value?   

I’d mentioned previously other artists whose personal reputation have been tainted by similar scandals, yet these are often pushed to the margins over the quality of their work and still remain desirable.

Rolf however lives in a very different society to that of those examples, and for the better. The nature of his crimes are today absolute societal lows. Rolf called have actually murdered someone and he wouldn’t be so widely and openly detested, and it sticks to. With this in mind I can see no real come back for the value of his work, even years down the line from now.

The originals may see some bounce back, but I wouldn’t count on it and as for the signed limited editions, not generally purchased with investment in mind anyway unless you’re buying Lowry or Banksy prints. Most prints tend not to hold their retail value and are usually purchased due to a very personal connection.

I’m under no illusion though that some people will have bought RH prints as investment pieces. As with anything bought for investment, even what seems like the safest commodity can suffer a dramatic (or crash).

So what advice can I give to someone who owns an original or print and most likely paid a reasonable penny for it?

This s difficult to say. Some people I’ve spoken with believe that in a few years the news will be forgotten and prices will rise, hence the rush we’ve seen already by some people to snap up cheap Harris’s.

There has been speculation over the years that the prices of Rolf’s original works were increased due to his celebrity status rather than his artistic ability (I have my own thoughts on the quality of his work that I won’t disclose here), which if so means his artwork like his celeb status is now dead in the water.

But then there are those speculators who think there will be a turn around, if you think they have something, stick it under your bed wait a few years, see how things go. If you really like the piece keep it on your wall, I wouldn’t expect it to go down well at dinner parties though…

If you do have a piece and are worried about selling it or simply having it, I’ve seen reports of bonfires then the best thing to do is contact the gallery you got it from or wack it on ebay, you never know some speculator may give you at least some of what paid back.

 

We’re Off to the Hamptons

June-2014newsletter

It won’t be long now until the gallery jets off to the Hamptons for the areas seminal art fair.

Now in its seventh successful year, ArtHamptons has established itself as the “must attend” art buying and social event of the Hamptons at the magnificent Sculpture Fields of Nova’s Ark.

Every year, the East End community comes together to celebrate the Hamptons’ long history as a haven for the creation and patronage of art.

George Thornton Art will be joining galleries from around the world.

Running from 10th-13th July 2014

The Gallery will closed between 5th July – 17th July  whilst we show our works.
If you have any queries or need to get in touch during that time, please email and I will do my utmost to get back to you.

Flatiron streets low‘Flatiron Streets’ by Rachel Tighe
Original Art: Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 48″ x 36″
Price: £1,750 $ 2,966

Boom or Bust? The Art Bubble…

With news that house prices are once again rising out of control, that they need regulating and that a new bubble is forming, should we be concerned about the art market?

In this particular case what I mean by the art market is the very top end. The end reserved only to the top 1% of the world’s population. Just last month the New York branch of Christies held an auction that took almost 745 million dollars (Approximately £450 million sterling). Making it the highest grossing auction ever!

In the past such highs, such records have always come before a fall and it may be worth keeping an eye open for signs of a fall. Like most economic trends the art market is very much cyclical seeing drops fall in the 1990’s the 1970’s and during the Great Depression at the end of the 1920’s when many established Victorian and Edwardian artists whose art were breaking the records of their time crashed enormously, inflated initially by the types of auction we saw at Christies last week

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Marc Quinn’s, sculptor of Kate Moss outside Christie’s New York which sold for $1.3million

 

The art market seems to have survived the latest crash, buoyed by investors from emerging markets in the Middle East, China and the newly wealthy looking to build collections. Another factor in all this seems to be a growing trend to guarantee the art coming to auctions, it transpires that 40 of the 72 lots on offer last week had already in theory been sold.

These guarantees cement high prices for the works of art pre-sale and prevent those works (and the artist) failing to sell looking weak in the eyes of the market. If the sale goes over the guarantee then the piece is sold to the highest bidder while the party who placed the guarantee gets a cut of the sale. This practice although not new is becoming increasingly common and threatens to artificially market prices. On the other hand, it also protects investment and does stave off market crashes and benefits us all across the entire art world. This practice is really no different to other measures imposed on the housing market, the banks and other sectors to try and ward off financial hardship.  
  
Despite the warning I gave earlier, I don’t think we’ve seen the last of these records or market highs just yet. The art market having survived the latest economic downturn relatively unscathed appears even more appealing to those looking to invest.  

Here at George Thornton Art we may not quite be selling our works to the 1% of society (yet), but a number of our artists, such as Kate Brinkworth and Laurie Williamson are already selling through auction houses. As in all areas, the artists we sell are driven by the fashions coming out of the top end of the market and the gallery thrives on a new breed of art fair, where buyers reflect and mirror the trends established at these types of events. Hopefully the art we deal in the gallery today will be tomorrows masters.

www.georgethorntontonart.com

Artwork on line and available in the Nottingham gallery – 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN