‘Weird Science’ an Exhibition by Gail Troth Opens Tomorrow.

Image

Exhibition: Saturday 29th March – Friday 4th March
Opening Reception: Saturday 29th March: Meet the artist 1pm – 4pm

 

It’s almost here, the Gail Troth Exhibition opens it doors tomorrow.

Make sure you drop by the gallery, enjoy a glass of wine, some nibbles and of course get the chance to meet the artist herself who will be here from 1 – 4pm.

See work from over 5 of her different collections, featuring her popular ‘Eternal Landscape’ series and works never seen in Nottingham before.

This is a fantastic opportunity as Gail Troth rarely makes a public appearances and to have her in gallery tomorrow will be a huge pleasure. So come along and do not miss out!!!!

If you have any further questions or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 29th March please do not hesitate to contact the gallery.

Image

Upcoming Exhibition: ‘Weird Science’ By Gail Troth Paintings that Paint Themselves

Billion Year Old Carbon 121 x 76‘Billion Year Old Carbon’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 47.5″ x 30″
£1,695 or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

George Thornton Art would like to cordially invite you to the opening of our upcoming exhibition of the fantastic Gail Troth

Exhibition: Saturday 29th March – Friday 4th March
Opening Reception: Saturday 29th March: Meet the artist 1pm – 4pm

‘Weird Science’ will be a show displaying the various sides of Troth, bringing together examples from six of the artists collections including works from the popular eternal landscape range. This reflective exhibition aims to share the scope and diversity of Troth’s work, showing just how much can be achieved using her unique and experimental painting technique.

In order to create her works, Troth adds a variety of thinners and alcohol to acrylic and oil paints changing the mass density of the paint. This mass is changed continuously during each paintings creation.

Using these altered paints she constructs her images using a drip paint technique: Dropping paint onto a fluid canvas, forming concentric circles as it hits the surface. As the paintings dry, they create a delicate pattern beyond manual dexterity, which have an intriguing effect on the canvas.

For those already familiar Troth’s work this will be a fantastic opportunity to meet the artist herself. Troth will in the gallery from 1pm until 4pm on Saturday 29th March. This will be rare chance to meet her as she does not usually choose to publicly attend her exhibitions. Don’t miss out.

Please have a look at some of the featured work that will be on display above and below.

If you have any further questions or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 29th March please do not hesitate to contact the gallery.

Mutual Gravity NY Night 90cmx90cm‘New York Night’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Cedella's Son 101x101‘Cedella’s Son’
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 40″
£1,950 or available or pay through own art, pay just £195 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Mutual Gravity Times Square 90cmx 90cm‘New York Times Square’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

EL 10-451 100x50‘Surreal View’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 20″
£995 or available or pay through own art, pay just £995 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

New Artist: Sara-Jane Szikora

From Friday (14 March), The Gallery is proud to welcome the return of Sarah Jane Szikora and her ‘sweet-shop style’ art back to Nottingham.

Sarah-Jane is a partially sighted leading artist who’s quirky and niche work depicts imaginary worlds and outrageously exaggerated figures – in this case, enormously fat, rather benign-looking characters with tiny heads.

Sarah-Jane has been compared to the late great painter Beryl Cook, but her characters are more concerned with food – cream cakes, battenbergs, sugar mice and her iconic gingerbread men, who frequently feature in her compositions.

Sarah is a leading niche artist hugely recognisable for her quirky and humorous take on the human condition and everyday life.

I have known Sarah for many years, and her detail is incredible – however, it’s her humorous and sometimes sarcastic take on everything around us that I find most satisfying. I challenge even the sternest individual not to break into a smile when viewing her paintings.

She has a huge following and has been eagerly anticipated by the city’s art lovers so I’m really excited to be able to show her work in my gallery.

Szikora’s work has been displayed in galleries across the UK and overseas as well as in major London shows – and reproduced as limited edition prints, sculpture, Royal Worcester ceramic ware and much more.

Take a look at the Szikora’s work below and if you would like any further information or see close up images of the works if you can’t make it in gallery then please do not hesitate to contact myself or Daniel at the Gallery.

Image

“Taking the Waters”
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: W: 42″ H: 60″
Price: £5,500 Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10 or 12 or 18 months (Interest free)

This particular piece is a snapshot of a natural bathing house in Szikora’s fathers native Hungary that she likes to visit whenever she’s in Budapest.

Image

“Tutti Frutti”
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: W: 42″ H: 52″
Price: £4,500 Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10, 12 or 18 months (Interest free)

Szikora’s life long dream is to one day open her very own Ice-Cream Parlour. This particular piece of work is how the artist envisages her own parlour would look right down to the black and white tiles and ice cream cone lighting ornaments.

Image

“Damien’s Dress”
Signed Limited Edition: Giclee Print (Artists Proof Edition of 5)
Dimensions: W: 24″ H: 24″
Price: £395 or spread the payment over 10 installments, just £39.50 a month

Image

“Blushin Dolls”
Signed Limited Edition: Giclee Print (Edition of 5)
Dimensions: W: 18″ H: 13″
Price: £295 or spread the payment over 10 installments, just £29.50 a month

From Dust to Rust: The Beauty of Decay

detroit1The Michigan Central Station, Detroit

Whether capturing in oil the crumbling remains of Tintern Abbey in 1794, maintaining the chaotic atmosphere of a stately home frozen in the 1950’s, regenerating a failed utopian experiment in Sheffield or witnessing the city wide decay of Detroit. There is an undeniable draw and intrigue surrounding the decline and decay of these once great landmarks.

These fallen symbols are perhaps so appealing because of the way they eloquently capture the passage of time, an intangible yet very present symbol of the human life-cycle. They draw us in and make us question the ways in which we view the world today and how we examine our collective history. This is by no means a new phenomenon, artists and others have viewed such ruin; Turner and other Romantics spent much of their time in the late eighteenth century visiting such sites and longing for a return to a golden age of Medieval England, just as the country began to feel the bite of the Industrial Revolution.

Ruins of West Front, Tintern Abbey circa 1794-5 by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851“Ruins of West Front, Tintern Abbey” by J. M. W. Turner (1794-5)

It has became inevitable that certain landmarks that are now so engrained and celebrated within the rich fabric of our lives be preserved, if not restored. Few could imagine a country void of country houses and ancient castles, institutions that faced extinction following World War II, but saved largely thanks to organisations such as The National Trust. These houses for the best part are preserved during their nineteenth century heydays, although in the case of Calke Abbey this is turned very much on its head. Here the idea of decay is very much celebrated; embodying a time machine like quality that marks the houses fall from grace.

824%2F28%2FSir+Vauncy%27s+Bedroom+-+John+Parkinson+_thumb_460x0%2C0An Un-Stately Home, Calke Abbey (Derbyshire)

Not all however are deemed worthy of preservation. The argument to preserve or not preserve can have profound effects and raise passionate argument. One of the most contentious contemporary issues is what to do with old Nazi monuments and relics. Should we leave them to rot and slide slowly into the past or preserve them in order to educate and allow them to stand as a warning to future generations? What to do with the Nazi rally grounds in Nuremberg, Germany is a highly publicised example of this argument; some want it left untouched, others want it destroyed entirely and others want it preserving. Such passions bring to light the enduring effect ruins can have on the people they touch and society as a whole.

Our interest in ruins is not just about a celebratory obsession, but a remembrance of the past, celebrating creativity and mourning of a time gone by, lost but not forgotten.  A standing testament that encapsulates: Not only design and taste, but social thought and the cultural ideals that effects our very understanding of today’s world.