The Art of ‘Abstract’ with a view on Scottish artist, Jan Nelson

Abstract art is art that does not attempt to represent an accurate depiction of a visual reality but instead use shapes, colours, forms and gestural marks to achieve its effect.

24x24 Crash Gybe Imminent!

‘Crash Gybe Imminent’ Acrylic on Canvas (framed)

The word abstract strictly speaking means to separate or withdraw something from something else. In that sense, it is applied to art in which the artist has started with some visible object and abstracted elements from it to arrive at a more or less simplified form. Here you can see work by Scottish artist Jan Nelson who builds up layers of paint to create enigmatic sailing scenes.

Abstraction of Art is not a new form; in fact since the dawn of time pottery and early cave paintings show linear crafted markings which in turn create loose shapes. Nowadays the modern abstract idea probably emerged from Cubism and over the last 50 years has remained prominent in many a museum and gallery space. In my opinion you tend to see much less abstract work in commercial spaces due to the content and lack of connection by the viewer. Is it more difficult to have a connection with a piece that has to be explained… ? I suppose the trick for any artist who verges on ‘Abstract Art’ is to communicate their feelings or image in a way that is clearly understood. So why would any commercial artist choose Abstraction? Already the bar is set high… Already the cards are stacked…

I’m always intrigued with how the public embrace or detract from this movement. Looking again at the work of Jan Nelson, it has been a long time since I’ve seen as many art lovers as fully engage with an artist and her work. So why is this? Could it be the current interior market? The splash of colour which brightens up the family home or the avid sailors love of the sport or possibly the fact that although within a abstract guise Jan Nelsons ability to feed detail onto the canvas is astonishing? I feel the later is poignant. I assume her ability to portray figures in boats and the energy of the sport allows us to connect, understand and appreciate her work. In the same way that ‘Cubism’ evolved into ‘Abstraction’, Jan’s paintings highlight themselves by promoting not only the form of ‘abstraction’ but also that sense of realism giving the onlooker that sense of connection.

Jan Nelson’s forth coming exhibition commences the final Saturday in May.
30th May – 5th June.
Artist Appearance – Saturday 30th May: 2pm until 5pm.
Contact us george@georgethorntonart.com for details.

Gallery – 12A Flying Horse Walk Nottingham – 01159243555

12x22 Heading Inshore

‘Heading Inshore’ Acrylic on Canvas (framed)

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