Wildlife Art by Christopher Green

Tiger - CGR

This talented artist, based in Nottingham, demonstrates his love and understanding of his medium in his ethereal, colour rich paintings of a Tiger. Inspired by purist, Christopher Green brings a lavish quality to the animals that he depicts on board. Brush strokes, scratches and the sheer exuberance of the laying on of paint make his exciting representations of noble beasts a pleasure to behold.

Here Christopher Green depicts the Tiger in his prime, fully alert and looking frankly magnificent. Christopher Greens hyper realistic tiger appears almost ghost like as though he has been captured pictorially in situ. But how realistic is that version of ‘in situ’? I would argue that both settings are alien to the majority of the public, most not having personally experienced a close encounter with a large cat. This absence, this permission for the audience to view the tiger as they will, lends a more contemporary tone surely more fitting in a 21st century environment. That aside, no one can deny the skill of reconstruction. Every strand of hair, reflection in the eye and almost wet nose is painted to perfection. The skill of Christopher Green in visually reproducing the animal and giving it its own space to be admired is a stunning tribute of skill as a wildlife artist.

Christopher Green famous for portraits of a more graphic ‘Pop Art’ style has changed direction within this composition. The results outline just how talented he can be with a brush and paint palette. The work is on display within our gallery together with a multitude of further works.

Click here for further details – George Thornton Art, 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

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Day in Margate – Tracey Emin’s infamous “Bed”

The weather was cold and wet, not worth staying home for, so, little trip down Margate seem liked a good idea. The white angular Turner Contemporary, is a stark contrast to the historic Margate seafront and light years away from the Dreamland amusement park at the other end of the prom.

The Contemporary’s current exhibition, pairing Tracey Emin’s infamous “bed” with original Turner seascapes, seemed incongruous. Until you remember, Turner was as eccentric and controversial in his day, as Emin and the rest of the Young British Art movement were in the nineties.

On it’s own in the middle of the Gallery floor, Turners hung behind, “the bed” looked a little like something that had been dropped from the sky. Dirty underwear and rumpled sheets, empty bottles, cigarette stubs and condoms, yellowing a little and showing their twenty years of age.

It was like a story part told, the action stopped unfinished. Surprisingly, the Turners have the same quality, sea frozen, stopped as the waves crashed. Two moments in time, captured, centuries apart.

The end of the story came from Emin’s video narrative of the bed’s reconstruction, it brought humanity I had not previously seen. “The bed” was her chaotic world and it’s conception changed that world, catapulting her into the art world’s spotlight.

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For Emin, twenty years on, she is voluntarily dry, celibate and non smoking. What ever you may think of it as art, it is possible that “the bed” saved at least one life.

George Thornton Art – Keep updated – http://www.georgethorntonart.com/register

12A Flying Horse Walk,

Nottingham,

NG1 2HN

tel : 01159243555 web : http://www.georgethorntonart.com