Refresh your style… be bold, be colourful, be arty!

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Time to fall in love with art… Be bold. Be beautiful. The Gallery is a wash with new art on display! Limited editions and originals. Find out more online or pop in and see whats on the agenda for the coming weeks.

View some of our featured works in this month.

We have some great pieces in the gallery and many more online… GEORGE THORNTON ART

ADU - Singapore Skyline

‘Singapore Skyline’ by Alicia Dubnyckyj
Original Artwork : Gloss on Wood
Price £2,750

Contact us for Own Art Details – Purchase amazing art by spreading the cost over 10 months.

Alicia has appeared on Channel 4 and the BBC and her work has been featured widely in the media in magazines and broadsheets including Vogue and the The NY Arts Magazine, and both Esquire and The Independent listed her as one of their top 21st century artists to invest in. She also boasts a prestigious list of collectors from the worlds of sport, music, business and fashion, notably George Boetang, Ron Dennis, Tony Rogers, Nicky Wire and Sir David Tang, as well as the Kuwaiti Royal Family.

 

CEPHALOTHIN - DHI

Cephalothin’ by Damien Hirst
Signed Limited Edition
Price £12,000

The artist Damien Hirst has become a British art phenomenon since winning the Turner Prize in 1995. His work as a sculptor, installation artist, painter and print maker has both amazed and made him no stranger to controversy.

 

Ashes, Ashes, We ALL Fall Down

‘Ashes to Ashes, They ALL Fall Down’ by Louise McNaught
Signed Limited Edition
Priced at £250 (unframed) or £400 (mounted and framed)
Spread the payment for a framed limited edition over 10 months with our Own Art Scheme, just £40.00 per month

McNaught celebrates the glory of nature and animals. She uses blazing neon colours and mixed media to give her subjects a godlike, heavenly quality. Louise’s gentle touch highlights the delicate relationship we humans have with nature.

 

Kirsty - detail

‘Conformation’ by Kirsty Mackay
Original Artwork : Industrial Paints on Canvas
Price £800

Contact us for Own Art Details – Purchase amazing art by spreading the cost over 10 months.

Mackay uses the process of painting to build shape and form, but also allowing for the calculated element of chance spontaneity and flux. This results in a wealth of colour and pattern which although chaotic and consuming, offers a new quiet discourse.

 

 

still life jar boiled sweets

‘Still Life jar Boiled Sweets’ by Christopher Green
Original Artwork : Oil on Board
Price £2,650

Green paints ‘hyper’ realism. Although he often uses photography to capture transient lighting conditions, he has absolutely no desire to produce a faithful reproduction of the photographs themselves. Instead he uses the images as reference points for the creation of a heightened, idealised reality.

For all the details regarding art viewed here today, online and within our Nottingham studio do get in touch.

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN
Telephone – 01159243555

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Antony Gormley’s “Standing Matter” (2010)

Standing Matter 2010

Antony Gormley’s ‘Standing Matter’ (2010) is a piece of human appreciation of the weight of mans’ imperfection faced with those perfect symmetrical blocks of his own creation. A human without angles and anonymous against colourless outlines speaks to the hopelessness of the human condition – relentless progress of the Lego block constructions of our weak and featureless imaginations against the molecular structure less shape of our existence. Exquisite.

‘Standing Matter’ is on display in the Gallery and available to purchase. Framed and certified with Gormley’s signature on the reverse.

http://www.georgethorntonart.com/Arti…/Antony-Gormley/Art-By

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk ~ Nottingham ~ NG1 2HN

Tel ; 01159243555

 

 

Fake or Fortune. The Art of David Henty in the style of Jean Michel Basquiat

A Jean Michel Basquiat painting “Untitled Skull” sold for $110.5 million during one of the most riveting auction battles in history. It is a painting that bleeds history, Jean-Michel Basquiat’s Untitled Skull (1982) portrays a black skull scarred with red rivulets, pitted with angry eyes, gnashing its teeth, against a blue graffiti wall on which someone has been doing their sums. A graffiti-esque style, erratic and easy brush strokes – the epitome of Jean Michele Basquiat’s style. This record sale catapults this deceased artist into the history books with art historians the world over branding him as a pioneer of the Neo-Expressionist art boom (circa 1980s) and one to be revered, wilder than Jackson Pollock, more profound than Mark Rothko.

 

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JEAN MICHEL-BASQUIAT, UNTITLED, 1982. ESTIMATE IN EXCESS OF $60 MILLION. SOLD FOR $110.5 MILLION

 

Almost 30 years after his death, with auction houses dealing in his work daily, the Barbican Centre (in the City of London) has put together one of the largest and most significant collections outside the U.S. featuring rare film, photography and archive material. The show captures the spirit of this self-taught artist. With Basquiat now hitting the headlines regularly his notoriety and possibly price bracket will almost certainly rise. Here in the gallery we are showcasing one artist that pays homage to his work. Welcome David Henty. A convicted forger, he has managed to capture the style of Basquiat like no other artist I’ve ever seen. Not only is the work almost identical with every brush stroke, but David Henty has managed to capture the raw, uncensored, and fiercely magnificent passion in his work to recreate undeniably outstanding copies of Basquiat’s art.

 

Basquiat untitles

 

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Above image top – Jean Michel Basquiat original

Above image bottom – David Henty copy

 

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‘Fallen Angel’ (1981) by David Henty – Original art in the style of Jean Michel Basquiat

 

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Skull‘ by David Henty – Original art in the style of Jean Michel Basquiat

 

To view these works and many further pieces by David Henty do join us in the gallery

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159243555

 

The British and our Love Affair with Modern Art

Post war artists were experimenting, frustrated by a global situation over which they had no control. The ability and need to answer questions and break rules had never been so prevalent and it was with this mind set that modern and therefore conceptual art was born. This movement created a trendy, cosmopolitan audience for contemporary modern art. A form that although at the time provided artist and dealers with incredible monetary gain,  at that time the idea of modern art was not exposed worldwide and certainly not enjoyed by all.

The problem with modern art is the same problem we all face when encountering something new, which is comprehension. It doesn’t matter if you are an art lover, creator or academic, if you don’t understand you tend to switch off. Now 50 years ago when Modern Art and by that I mean art of a conceptual nature i.e. ‘Pop Art’ or ‘Abstract’ was hitting the headlines in America the British were taking a stance of denial. In true British fashion we erred towards a conservative view of the movement – sticking to what we knew worked, sold and what we liked. Rapidly moving forward, Britain’s position on modern art has changed dramatically.  Possibly enhanced by dealers like Charles Saatchi and show rooms like the Tate we now find ourselves embracing the conceptual movement and providing platforms not only for some of the greatest known living artists but also those younger, emerging stars of the future. We host the Turner prize which, up until 1991 was deemed not important enough for the general public to understand, however, after a televised showing of the competition, it was soon understood that us Brits do love a bit of Modern Art. Maybe we have changed our psychology? Maybe we have changed our views, as internationally known artists born and bred in this country are now touted as legends of the  modern generation. Something to give us credence and an emblem to be proud of. Whatever the reason, fundamentally the British public have become a nation of modern art lovers. Embracing and showcasing our ideas to the world. This is certainly compounded by the huge spend and investment the government is now ploughing into projects such as the development of ‘Tate Modern’. A ‘Free Entrance’ art gallery which encourages art lovers from all over the world to enter and enjoy what us Brits deem fit to be considered modern art of international standards.

George Thornton Art prides itself on offering a range of art from different movements and we’d love to share our artists, modern, abstract or figurative with you.  Call in or call us – we have superlative art in an independent gallery.

atomised

“Atomised” by Russell Hatton

Industrial Spray Paints on Aluminum

Original Artwork

£3,950

 

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“Bang” by MrGo

Signed limited edition, gold leaf hand embellished print on paper.

(Edition of 25)

£295 Framed.

 

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“Space Cadet” by Darren Fraser

Oil and Pencil on Box Canvas

Original Artwork

£1,750

 

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159243555

 

 

Skin Deep. For the love of a Skull…

For centuries skull imagery was the main focus of mainstream artistic endeavor. Egyptians, Greeks and the Romans were famed for treasuring the skull and thus depictions of skinless facial features have been excavated for 1000s of years. By the 16th century skulls were becoming so central to European culture that, with a largely illiterate proletariat, depictions of skulls informed and educated as well as decorated.

So why do we love the skull? Well, certainly we can relate to one, after all we all have one, a shell structure that has evolved over millions of years which protects our most vital organ, exquisitely designed. However, the skull itself is far from a pretty object and why should it be..? Maybe it’s the fascination with its role in the human form as opposed to its aesthetic composition that is what fascinates us the most. At one point in art history all works of the skull were dark and macabre, possibly an insight into the harsh reality of living conditions in the Middle Ages. However, moving forward to the modern day, the skull is certainly an object of desire – the current love of skulls as a motif has never been so prevalent, guided by the some serious players in the world of fashion and art like the late Alexander McQueen and Damien Hirst.

Moving forward to the current time, skull imagery in art and its use as a device to engage the audience in the comfort of the familiar, whilst challenging perceptions, is a common occurrence.

From my point of view, as much as I love skull art, I do like my artists to push boundaries and try and incorporate an element of beauty within the work – and not just attempt to add commercial value to the commodity of their art. A juxtaposition (if you will) of showcasing something perceived as morbid and crossing this concept with elements of beauty. A selected number of my artists below have done just that using humour, flowers and even diamonds to not so subtly embellish an essentially macabre object associated with death and the human condition. I think they have achieved, each in their own way, a device to enable us to contemplate our respective fates in a surprising and strangely pleasurable way.

All works are on display in the gallery now.

Love You To Death Web

Mr Go : “Love you to Death”

Signed limited edition on paper, mounted and framed. (edition of 25)

£295

 

 

Christopher Green : “Red Bug”

Hyper Realism, Original Oil on Board

£2,500

 

Louise McNaught : “Born to Die”

Signed limited edition on paper. Edition of just 50 and presented within a black card mount and modern black matt frame.

£200 (unframed) or £350 (framed)

The gallery is showcasing this beautiful edition as well as the original painting entitled ‘Origin of Symmetry’

Magnus Gjoen : “Rose are Dead, (broken)”

Signed limited edition on paper. (edition of 50)  Presented within a card mount and modern black gloss frame.

£700 (unframed) or £835 (framed)

For all the updates follow the gallery on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Find us online or pop in and say hello!

Kind Regards,

George Thornton Art