Sara Pope – So Hot Right Now

Mathematician turned graphic designer, turned shoe designer, turned artist Sara Pope brings the vibrant, lively attitude of fashion to her ‘lippy’ paintings.

She combines the skill and craftmanship she learned from her time in fashion (working with Paul Smith, Lacoste and Jasmine Di Milo) with an eye for the glamour and sexual power conveyed by a pair of lips.

Her paintings of vivid, glossy lips in bold colours explore the landscape of pop culture, recalling John Pache’s famous Rolling Stones logo as much as Samuel Beckett’s mouthy monologue Not I.

Her paintings begin with a photo shoot where she paints a model’s lips and then tries to capture images conveying emotions like love and flirtation for inspiration. The painting process then involves several layers of thin oil-diluted paint being overlaid, blending and smoothing the colours extensively at every stage. Emulating the slickness of advertising, the result is glossy and irresistible.

THE ART OF SARA POPE

CONTROVERSY-145x145

Title – ‘Controversy’

Medium – Oil on Gesso Wooden Panel

Dimensions – 24in x 32in x 2in

Price – £2,500 (Framed)

 

 

RED-CARPET-RED-145x145

Title – ‘Red Carpet’

Medium – Oil on Gesso Wooden Panel, 24ct gold leaf background

Dimensions – 24in x 32in x 2in

Price – £3,000 (Framed)

 

 

dav

Title – So Hot Right Now

Medium – Oil on Gesso Covered Wooden Panel with Neon Light and Diamond Dust

Dimensions – 32in x 32in x 3in

Price – £7,000 (Framed)

 

Sara’s work is rapidly gaining attention around the world, having exhibited her work in London, Paris, New York and Florence. She even impressed her namesake Pope Francis with her painting. Her portrait has been accepted into the Vatican collection, which must be a first for a female Pope.

For all further information do contact the Gallery. We’re happy to help.

George Thornton Art ~ 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

Tel : 01159243555 E,mail : george@georgethorntonart.com

Wildlife Art by Christopher Green

Tiger - CGR

This talented artist, based in Nottingham, demonstrates his love and understanding of his medium in his ethereal, colour rich paintings of a Tiger. Inspired by purist, Christopher Green brings a lavish quality to the animals that he depicts on board. Brush strokes, scratches and the sheer exuberance of the laying on of paint make his exciting representations of noble beasts a pleasure to behold.

Here Christopher Green depicts the Tiger in his prime, fully alert and looking frankly magnificent. Christopher Greens hyper realistic tiger appears almost ghost like as though he has been captured pictorially in situ. But how realistic is that version of ‘in situ’? I would argue that both settings are alien to the majority of the public, most not having personally experienced a close encounter with a large cat. This absence, this permission for the audience to view the tiger as they will, lends a more contemporary tone surely more fitting in a 21st century environment. That aside, no one can deny the skill of reconstruction. Every strand of hair, reflection in the eye and almost wet nose is painted to perfection. The skill of Christopher Green in visually reproducing the animal and giving it its own space to be admired is a stunning tribute of skill as a wildlife artist.

Christopher Green famous for portraits of a more graphic ‘Pop Art’ style has changed direction within this composition. The results outline just how talented he can be with a brush and paint palette. The work is on display within our gallery together with a multitude of further works.

Click here for further details – George Thornton Art, 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

The Rise of Women

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Picture from Tracey Emin’s show: ‘She Lay Down Deep Beneath the Sea’

After centuries of being regarded as second class to men, it seems that finally the tables have turned and that women are no longer merely enjoying a sense of equality in areas, but are developing their own niches with women only floors in hotels, night clubs and gyms . So why is it that women still seem to lag behind in the art world, even today, the works of female artists seem to reach only a tenth of their male counterparts. Tracey Emin and Damian Hirst arguably share similar status and dominance in today’s art market, yet Hirst’s pieces carry much larger price tags.  

It was once taught and thought that women played no role in the history of art, something that Dana Arnold picked up on during her studies at UCLA. Since leaving her research has focused on the ways in which, art history is interpreted and the roles women have played. The truth simply is that the role of women has to one degree or another simply been ignored. As in other areas, the annuals of history and the rules of what makes a masterpiece was laid out by men for the benefit of men leaving little room for women.   

Despite histories ignorance women have been present and have played an important role. The Bayeux Tapestry was created by nuns, the Early Renaissance saw the arrival of named female artists such as Lavinia Fontana and Sofonisba Anguisciola, before being ousted in the latter stages of the movement. It was women who hand painted the Wedgewood vases and porcelain that is so highly regarded today. In fact their role and contribution to the popular culture of their time arguably outstrips that of males in the same period. Indeed, it is only due to their ostracism from high culture that they were deemed academically irrelevant for so long.       

This began to chance when in the 20th century, a surge of innovation and discovery questioned traditional views and the perception of women artists. Women made further gains, such as Georgia O’Keeffe, Louise Bourgeois, Camille Claudel, Sonia Delaunay, Laura Knight, Zinaida Serebriakova, Tamara de Lempicka and Natalia Goncharova. Culminating with Rachel Whiteread becoming the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993.

 

As our culture continues to embrace the role of women, the once held firm beliefs of women’s role within art are set to change. At the gallery we have already noticed a shift in this direction with 2 of top selling artists being women, Xue Wang and Gail Troth. With more interest and attention being paid to female artists than ever before, it seems likely that the value of both old and new works by female artists is set to rise.  

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‘Eternal Landscape in Blue’ by Gail Troth
Oil on Canvas
47″ x 15.5″
£995 or 10 monthly installments of just £99.50