What makes the artist JJ Adams so popular?

This exciting young artist is touted as being the Next Big Thing on the British art scene. With his challenge to the heart of British cultural values – members of the Royal family displayed with full sleeve tattoos, iconic buildings such as Buckingham Palace or the Palace of Westminster depicted defaced by graffiti, Adams strikes at the heart of our cultural consciousness with his work.

Harrods

‘Harrods’ by JJ Adams

In the same way that Banksy became the art world’s darling, filling the vacuum left by the end of the love affair with the YBAs, Adams is making a name for himself, aided by Wishbone Publishing, with his phenomenal output. Born in Plymouth, Adams was raised in South Africa, remaining there until the end of the apartheid era when he returned to these shores with the aim of becoming a tattoo artist. Little wonder then that his obsession with body art spills over into his work, evidenced in his ‘Tattoo Series’ where icons of royalty, music and the silver screen are depicted with awesome full sleeve and knuckle tattoos. The ubiquity of the tattoo in mainstream culture must play a part in his appeal to the mainstream art audience, but there is more to his art than purely capitalising on a social trend. His interest in printing and in graphic design – honed when working in the South West as a printer whilst experimenting with art in his spare time – are evident in the stylised way much of his work is presented. Combining media such as printing, collage, spray paint, screen prints and hand painted acrylics, his work has attracted attention from Christie’s, Rolls Royce, Vogue and GQ magazines with its rawness, energy and passion, but also with its accessibility and broad subject appeal.

But, like Banksy, Adams is certainly not a mainstream fine artist, and similarly, much of his work remains true to the roots of his style and influences. Where Banksy’s popularity came from the street through recognition of his graffiti and its subsequent elevation to ‘art’, Adams work is equally accessible and most importantly recognisable in its representation of things ‘normal’ that have been given Adams’ treatment which, in challenging their orthodoxy, cause the audience to consider their own response to these significant cultural icons. However, being able to picture ‘Harrods’ department store with graffitied windows and point of sale, somehow appeals to the British sense of humour and perhaps more importantly makes the audience question why the imagery is such a visual shock. To have the artistic vision to produce works that speaks on such an accessible level to the man / woman in the street and yet which so cleverly strikes at the heart of our culture is evidence of Adams’ skill and gives a big clue as to why his work is generating such excitement in the art – and wider – community. Fundamentally this is what makes JJ Adams so popular and undeniably an artist to invest in!

Wonder Woman - Colour

‘Wonder Woman’ by JJ Adams

 

Sonic Vs Mario

‘Sonic Vs Mario’ by JJ Adams

Collection available within our Nottingham Gallery

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

Tel : 01159243555 ~ Email : george@georgethorntonart.com

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The Art of Anna E Davies

Really LOVE, LOVE the art of Anna E Davies at the moment. Feel she is doing something different & really interesting. She works on board, telephone directories and using oil she works with abstract strokes to produce incredible figures.

See further work online – George Thornton Art

Journey

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The Art by Anna E Davies is on permanent display at George Thornton Art

(12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN) (Tel : 01159243555)

Exhibition Invite – ‘The Heat is On’

A Brilliant Line! 80x40cm

Please accept this email as your personal invite to our latest exhibition with the formidable Jan Nelson.

We are just so excited to be playing host to Jan Nelsons anticipated solo show in Nottingham from 14th – 21st July

You are welcome to come and meet the artist that opening Saturday 1pm until 4pm. Jan will be on hand to discuss her techniques, ideas and inspirations. We are expecting a busy day so do reserve your place – george@georgethorntonart.com

Surfing the Sound - 30x30cm

Surfing the Sound by Jan Nelson

Sunset Starburst! - 50x50cm

Sunset Sunburst by Jan Nelson

Simple strips of abstract colour make up enigmatic compositions! Jan Nelson, famous for her nautical scenes will be providing the gallery with something different this year… Landscapes, floral, sailing and motor sports will be in order and as ever you can expect a huge degree of colour and energy from this incredible artist.

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN
tel : 01159243555

Jane Thomson – Exalting the Everyday

Unfolding

Unfolding‘ by Jane Thomson – 100cm x 80cm x 7cm – Mixed Media / Board – £1,495

Nottingham-based painter and lecturer Jane Thomson produces unique and sensual monochrome pieces using layers of print, paper and text.

Her figures, white and pure, emerge from a chalky void like sculptures. The elegant poses of her fragile subjects are depicted as if in alabaster or marble, elevating the everyday lives of these women to the realm of heroes and historical figures depicted by Michelangelo and his peers.

Her latest work is inspired by the timeworn frescos found in the chapels and villas of Florence and recall the high art of the ancient world.

This is most clearly seen in Study for Invisible Ink which appears as much a lover’s sketch as an alternative perspective of Diana of Gabii, sculpted by Praxiteles – a pioneer of depictions of the nude female form – more than 2000 years ago.

Study for Invisible ink on her skin

Invisible Ink‘ by Jane Thomson – 34cm x 18cm x 4cm – Mixed Media / Board – £395

‘Invisible Ink’ is a piece which rewards reflection, appearing also as a female response to Rodin’s famous ‘The Thinker’.

The work of Jane Thomson is composed of distorted poems, fragments swirling around the central figure. The effect is one of revelation and concealment, exposure and mystery, with a sense of hidden depth in the layers of print, Oils and pencil.

Jane Thomson will be displaying artwork within our ‘Fragments’ exhibition 30th June until 7th July. Do come and view these fabulous artworks.

EXHIBITION – Jane Thomson ‘Fragments’

George Thornton Art – 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

Tel – 01159243555 : E.mail – george@georgethorntonart.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife Art by Christopher Green

Tiger - CGR

This talented artist, based in Nottingham, demonstrates his love and understanding of his medium in his ethereal, colour rich paintings of a Tiger. Inspired by purist, Christopher Green brings a lavish quality to the animals that he depicts on board. Brush strokes, scratches and the sheer exuberance of the laying on of paint make his exciting representations of noble beasts a pleasure to behold.

Here Christopher Green depicts the Tiger in his prime, fully alert and looking frankly magnificent. Christopher Greens hyper realistic tiger appears almost ghost like as though he has been captured pictorially in situ. But how realistic is that version of ‘in situ’? I would argue that both settings are alien to the majority of the public, most not having personally experienced a close encounter with a large cat. This absence, this permission for the audience to view the tiger as they will, lends a more contemporary tone surely more fitting in a 21st century environment. That aside, no one can deny the skill of reconstruction. Every strand of hair, reflection in the eye and almost wet nose is painted to perfection. The skill of Christopher Green in visually reproducing the animal and giving it its own space to be admired is a stunning tribute of skill as a wildlife artist.

Christopher Green famous for portraits of a more graphic ‘Pop Art’ style has changed direction within this composition. The results outline just how talented he can be with a brush and paint palette. The work is on display within our gallery together with a multitude of further works.

Click here for further details – George Thornton Art, 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

The British and our Love Affair with Modern Art

Post war artists were experimenting, frustrated by a global situation over which they had no control. The ability and need to answer questions and break rules had never been so prevalent and it was with this mind set that modern and therefore conceptual art was born. This movement created a trendy, cosmopolitan audience for contemporary modern art. A form that although at the time provided artist and dealers with incredible monetary gain,  at that time the idea of modern art was not exposed worldwide and certainly not enjoyed by all.

The problem with modern art is the same problem we all face when encountering something new, which is comprehension. It doesn’t matter if you are an art lover, creator or academic, if you don’t understand you tend to switch off. Now 50 years ago when Modern Art and by that I mean art of a conceptual nature i.e. ‘Pop Art’ or ‘Abstract’ was hitting the headlines in America the British were taking a stance of denial. In true British fashion we erred towards a conservative view of the movement – sticking to what we knew worked, sold and what we liked. Rapidly moving forward, Britain’s position on modern art has changed dramatically.  Possibly enhanced by dealers like Charles Saatchi and show rooms like the Tate we now find ourselves embracing the conceptual movement and providing platforms not only for some of the greatest known living artists but also those younger, emerging stars of the future. We host the Turner prize which, up until 1991 was deemed not important enough for the general public to understand, however, after a televised showing of the competition, it was soon understood that us Brits do love a bit of Modern Art. Maybe we have changed our psychology? Maybe we have changed our views, as internationally known artists born and bred in this country are now touted as legends of the  modern generation. Something to give us credence and an emblem to be proud of. Whatever the reason, fundamentally the British public have become a nation of modern art lovers. Embracing and showcasing our ideas to the world. This is certainly compounded by the huge spend and investment the government is now ploughing into projects such as the development of ‘Tate Modern’. A ‘Free Entrance’ art gallery which encourages art lovers from all over the world to enter and enjoy what us Brits deem fit to be considered modern art of international standards.

George Thornton Art prides itself on offering a range of art from different movements and we’d love to share our artists, modern, abstract or figurative with you.  Call in or call us – we have superlative art in an independent gallery.

atomised

“Atomised” by Russell Hatton

Industrial Spray Paints on Aluminum

Original Artwork

£3,950

 

mrgo-bang-gold-leafed-edition

“Bang” by MrGo

Signed limited edition, gold leaf hand embellished print on paper.

(Edition of 25)

£295 Framed.

 

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“Space Cadet” by Darren Fraser

Oil and Pencil on Box Canvas

Original Artwork

£1,750

 

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159243555

 

 

Stitched threads on Paper… Donna Rumble – Smith

Nottingham’s very own Donna Rumble – Smith plies her trade starting often with handwritten letters, poems, stories and thoughts of the past, the present and of the future. These ideas blend and evolve to create installations, artists books and wall pieces. Quite often the concept dictates what the work will become.

‘Piccadilly Memphis’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Donna’s work intends to capture special moments and reflections of conversations which are personal and intimate; about journeys and people.

Incorporated within the work Donna includes architecture allowing structured patterns to flow through the paper, giving a beautiful depiction of city living.

‘Bristol Harbourside’ – Original artwork: Stitched threads, acrylic and pencil over layered with poetry text, inked onto transparent paper

 

‘The Shard’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Art by Donna Rumble – Smith is on permanent display in our Nottingham gallery. We will also be exhibiting her work in Bristol for the Affordable Art Fair which runs 8th – 11th September. For tickets do contact the gallery  – 01159243555

 

George Thornton Art
12A Flying Horse Walk
Nottingham
NG1 2HN

E.Mail – george@georgethorntonart.com