Gender Equality in the Art World.

Set Fire to the Rain - Louise

SET FIRE TO THE RAIN By Louise McNaught

 

News this week pertaining to Woman in Art and the argument of equality has been a debate for generations. Bonham’s have taken the stance to initiate and redress gender equality in the art world.

Gender equality is something that the UK continues to strive towards, but lack of opportunity for women is still a very real issue. A lack of senior female figures on the boards of UK business and industry greatly undermines our economy and makes for a perpetuation of male dominated patterns of behaviour in the professional world. However, gender roles are changing for both men and women in Britain and we must ensure equal opportunities for both sexes exist, more so than ever within the art market.

The highest price at auction for a work by the French sculptor Germaine Richier is £1.2m, compared with £91.6m for Alberto Giacometti, who studied alongside Richier. The difference in price driven by independent sales is astonishing and surely only speaks to the commonly held but unspoken perception that male generated art has more ‘value’ than that created by women.

Despite their treatment in the art world through history, women have been present and played an important role in art as artists and not just as the inspiration for the male gaze. The Bayeux Tapestry was designed and created by Nuns…

So as per usual George Thornton Art continues to ‘buck trends’ and we would like to salute our bank of Woman artists! We celebrate an almost 50% ratio of men to woman artists on our books. To strengthen arguments (in the case of our Nottingham Gallery) we are fortunate enough to represent the likes of Kate Brinkworth. An artist who continuously sells through auction houses in London. Even the larger publishing houses in the country don’t represent a young talent of this calibre!  Jan Nelson, who in terms of number of pieces sold, was by far our most successful artist in 2015. And not forgetting Alicia Dubnyckyj whose works commands prices in London close to £10,000 a painting; and Katy Jade Dobson who can now boast of clients having to wait an incredible two years for original commissions to be completed. Finally the gallery’s two latest signing of 2016 ‘Louise McNaught’ and ‘Kirsty Mackay’ are both woman… no inequality here, just really great art!

You can view work by our celebrated body of females below and further compositions can be found on our website. www.georgethorntonart.com

 

Coke and Stripey Straw

COKE AND STRIPY STRAW by Kate Brinkworth
Signed limited edition to just 50 copies.
Presented; float mounted within a large, black modern frame.

 

Crowded Course!

CROWDED COURSE By Jan Nelson
Beautifully crafted and presented in a large, white wood frame
£995 (spread the payment over 10 months interest free)

 

The Gherkin VIII, London 40 x 48 - £5,000

THE GHERKIN BY NIGHT By Alicia Dubnycykj
Fascination with cubes of colour and a love of paint itself are hallmarks for this contemporary artist.

 

KJD - Dumbo Webfile

DUMBO By Katy Jade Dobson
Signed limited edition: Presented within a large card mount and large black frame.
£395. Spread the payment over 10 months (interest free)

 

For all the information contact us –

{12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN} {01159 243 555} {george@georgethorntonart.com}

Kind Regards, George Thornton Art

 

 

 

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The Importance of Art

gallery 5George Thornton Art, Nottingham

An auction of contemporary art at Sothebys this week provoked some thought about how an artist, or even a piece of art gets classed as ‘important’ and actually what this means to the art buying audience. The auction at Sothebys was described as ‘a considered selection of artworks from Post-War innovators through to a new generation of artists working today.’ Prices ranged from thousands to hundreds of thousands of pounds, and many of the pieces auctioned sold for well in excess of their estimate, some reaching fifty percent in excess of the upper limit. None of the artists included in the sale were the superstars of the modern art world – no Koontz, Haring or Rothko – and yet those included were described as ‘important’ – and this seems to be the factor that pushed so many of the prices achieved above the upper estimate price.

Sothebys

Taking a look at some of the works sold, mostly abstract, modern works in this instance, I got to thinking about how the art buying public might possibly be persuaded or influenced to buy ‘important’ works. Discussion in the gallery on this topic centred on the reasons why people buy art. Three main answers to that – because the audience like a piece; because the audience has a ‘space’ that a piece of art fits into; because the audience views art as part of their investment strategy. And we agreed that it is the latter that is the most likely reason a buyer would be influenced by a view from someone in authority – like an art auction house or a dealer – whose opinion they trust. Fair enough, but would the first two reasons for buying art not be arguably more compelling? Buying art as investment, especially as part of a strategy for use of one’s investment funds, is fraught with risk and potentially could lead to disastrous consequences. One can only wonder what the collectors of Rolf Harris’ work are feeling in the light of recent events for example, and if pieces are being purchased only for their perceived value designated thus by ‘experts’ do the investing audience actually LIKE what they’re buying? Or are they just going on trend or analysis and not caring about the aesthetic value of the art they are buying. I would argue that it’s more important to actually own pieces of art that evoke a response in the audience, that fill a space in the collector’s heart, and not in their investment strategy. One may or may not end up with a piece of work that increases in financial value but the buyer who purchases pieces that provoke a feeling, or a way of seeing something differently, is intrinsically more valuable to the owner and the asset has more value than can simply be measured in financial terms.

Clearly I’m biased, but our customer base is one that values the intelligent, affordable art that we offer. Frequent introductions of new artists of interest, and operating totally independently the Gallery offers a refreshing art buying experience, one based on helping you find the pieces that you will love and cherish, regardless…

Below is a little flavour of what to expect from George Thornton Art.

Just DesertsSweet Desserts by Xue Wang. Original Oil on Board

EL 10-442 100x76cm

Meadow Lane by Gail Troth. Original Acrylic on Canvas

Heading down to the Line

Heading Down to the Line by Jan Nelson. Original Acrylic on Canvas

Bold & Beautiful web file

Bold and Beautiful by Dean Fox. Signed limited edition of just 45 copies on paper.

16b

Barn Owl by Stephen Rautenbach. Original Bronze sculpture

Boom or Bust? The Art Bubble…

With news that house prices are once again rising out of control, that they need regulating and that a new bubble is forming, should we be concerned about the art market?

In this particular case what I mean by the art market is the very top end. The end reserved only to the top 1% of the world’s population. Just last month the New York branch of Christies held an auction that took almost 745 million dollars (Approximately £450 million sterling). Making it the highest grossing auction ever!

In the past such highs, such records have always come before a fall and it may be worth keeping an eye open for signs of a fall. Like most economic trends the art market is very much cyclical seeing drops fall in the 1990’s the 1970’s and during the Great Depression at the end of the 1920’s when many established Victorian and Edwardian artists whose art were breaking the records of their time crashed enormously, inflated initially by the types of auction we saw at Christies last week

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Marc Quinn’s, sculptor of Kate Moss outside Christie’s New York which sold for $1.3million

 

The art market seems to have survived the latest crash, buoyed by investors from emerging markets in the Middle East, China and the newly wealthy looking to build collections. Another factor in all this seems to be a growing trend to guarantee the art coming to auctions, it transpires that 40 of the 72 lots on offer last week had already in theory been sold.

These guarantees cement high prices for the works of art pre-sale and prevent those works (and the artist) failing to sell looking weak in the eyes of the market. If the sale goes over the guarantee then the piece is sold to the highest bidder while the party who placed the guarantee gets a cut of the sale. This practice although not new is becoming increasingly common and threatens to artificially market prices. On the other hand, it also protects investment and does stave off market crashes and benefits us all across the entire art world. This practice is really no different to other measures imposed on the housing market, the banks and other sectors to try and ward off financial hardship.  
  
Despite the warning I gave earlier, I don’t think we’ve seen the last of these records or market highs just yet. The art market having survived the latest economic downturn relatively unscathed appears even more appealing to those looking to invest.  

Here at George Thornton Art we may not quite be selling our works to the 1% of society (yet), but a number of our artists, such as Kate Brinkworth and Laurie Williamson are already selling through auction houses. As in all areas, the artists we sell are driven by the fashions coming out of the top end of the market and the gallery thrives on a new breed of art fair, where buyers reflect and mirror the trends established at these types of events. Hopefully the art we deal in the gallery today will be tomorrows masters.

www.georgethorntontonart.com

Artwork on line and available in the Nottingham gallery – 12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

 

 

The impressive work of Kate Brinkworth

Kate Brinkworth undertook her artistic training at Nottingham Trent University, and graduated in 2000 with first class honours. She rapidly began showing her work, exhibiting here in the UK, Sweden and the U.S. She has won numerous awards and accolades as well as selling through top auction houses such as Christie’s. A venture which is something any living artist aspires to achieve.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/paintings/kate-brinkworth-tall-coke-5762480-details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=5762480&sid=305c8de3-efd0-4711-a0c1-bb148ca17f44

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‘Moet’ – Original Artwork: Oil on Board

Kate is particularly inspired by effects created through experimentation with focus, as she repeatedly photographs her ‘still life’s’ with various shutter speeds, camera angles and lighting to find the optimum composition.

I personally find that the genre and style of ‘Pop Art’ is revamped and re-branded in many ways to suit the modern market place. Actually the term ‘Pop Art’ is really a play on words and synonymous with an actual time in history and not the present day, however I have to admit that Kate elevates this style of art and really delivers something new and innovating by way of challenging our perception of everyday images, encouraging us to look differently at these somewhat out of focus and off set paintings. A developed technique that very few artist’s have managed to accept and put into practise with such precision and detail.

The images below reiterate Kate’s ability and talent.

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‘Oxford Circus’ by Kate Brinkworth

Original Artwork: Oil on Board (unframed)

Dimensions: 24″ x 34″

Price: £3,500

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This detailed image of ‘Oxford Circus’ shows Kate’s ability to capture reflection.

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This detailed image exudes perfection with regards Kate’s attention to detail.

For more information contact the gallery {george@georgethorntonart.com} {01159 243 555}

or

Pop in to the gallery in Nottingham and view this incredible work in the flesh!