Stitched threads on Paper… Donna Rumble – Smith

Nottingham’s very own Donna Rumble – Smith plies her trade starting often with handwritten letters, poems, stories and thoughts of the past, the present and of the future. These ideas blend and evolve to create installations, artists books and wall pieces. Quite often the concept dictates what the work will become.

‘Piccadilly Memphis’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Donna’s work intends to capture special moments and reflections of conversations which are personal and intimate; about journeys and people.

Incorporated within the work Donna includes architecture allowing structured patterns to flow through the paper, giving a beautiful depiction of city living.

‘Bristol Harbourside’ – Original artwork: Stitched threads, acrylic and pencil over layered with poetry text, inked onto transparent paper

 

‘The Shard’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Art by Donna Rumble – Smith is on permanent display in our Nottingham gallery. We will also be exhibiting her work in Bristol for the Affordable Art Fair which runs 8th – 11th September. For tickets do contact the gallery  – 01159243555

 

George Thornton Art
12A Flying Horse Walk
Nottingham
NG1 2HN

E.Mail – george@georgethorntonart.com

The love of the city…

Portobello Flowers low

“Portobello Flowers” By Rachel Tighe

Depictions of cities have been popular with both artist and audience for centuries. Virtually every movement in art has contained within it works that represent cities and arguably the iconography of these metropolises has been in no small part generated and reinforced by these representations. George Thornton Art has cityscapes on show in the gallery by three very different artists with three very different perspectives (quite literally, as well as figuratively) on major cities and it is very interesting to examine how their works represent the cities they have chosen.

Alicia Dubnycykj is an exciting artist who brings a sense of the speed and vibrance of her chosen cities to stunning life on her large canvases. In ‘Arc de Triomphe’ an aerial angular view of the iconic landmark at night, the streetlamps and car headlights seem alive and appear to actually be flickering on the canvas. Use of reflective glossy paint, especially when viewed in an artificially lit environment, persuades the viewer that the work is alive and full of movement. A capital city is frequently the synecdoche of a nation and the technique here, of lighting the Arc de Triomphe itself as the visual focus of the piece set in a surrounding of darkness, punctuated only by the street lights that lead the viewer’s eye to the Arc itself, achieves this extremely well. The Arc de Triomphe ‘becomes’ France.

Alicia Dubnyckyj Arc de Triomphe V  Gloss paint on MDF

“Arc De Triomphe” By Alicia Dubnycykj

In contrast, the representation of New York in ‘After Dark’ by artist Matt Colagiuri is a post impressionistic view of the city – the construction of the city and its identity signified through signs. Bright neon signs in primary colours contrast dramatically with the blackness of the New York night against which these are depicted. His use of photographic mosaic tiles set at different heights with a super glossy coating convey the sense of a vibrant and dynamic city purely through the use of recognised signs that speak of the United States. Still clearly a cityscape, but one that relies on a different way of defining and identifying NYC than that based purely on buildings.

After Dark

“After Dark” By Matt Colagiuri

And by way of a total contrast to both artists is the work of Rachel Tighe. Her seemingly naïve representations of recognisable city views belie the cleverness in their execution. The artist confidently expects that the audience will recognise her interpretation of a given skyline and this gives her free rein to represent them in her own absolutely unique style. Having the courage to leave white, unpainted spaces on the canvas and to depict skylines of famous edifices (for example in Gondola View, Venice) in simplistic ways that still effectively convey the location is a real talent and shows the maturity of Tighe in her work.

NYC rooftops at dawn (low)

“NYC Rooftops at dawn” By Rachel Tighe

So there you have it – three completely different ways of generating a response to cities, all highly effective and all most definitely provoke a reaction in the audience. They all reinforce the visual connotations of landmarks and skylines that are burned into our cultural consciousness.

George Thornton Art is Pleased to Announce a New Partnership with Nottingham Based Company “The Storage Bed”

 photo 1

The Gallery is excited to announce a new partnership with ‘The Storage Bed’. Artworks by some of our amazing artists will be featured on their walls and we think its a perfect match.

It’ll be great to show our artists work in an arena that gives some contextual feeling to the pieces and is the perfect platform from which to introduce the gallery to people who may not otherwise have known about us.

Here at the gallery we only display the finest quality pieces, which have been painstakingly created to the highest quality. In this sense both the art on show and the beds on offer compliment the other beautifully, making this venture a perfect match for both companies.

“The Storage Bed” company based in Calverton, Nottingham design and produce high quality storage beds. Set up in 2007 by its founder David Norman, the company has gone from strength to strength and we are very happy to be working with another local business.The companies London Studio is open weekly and can be visited on an appointment only basis.

Have a look at our websites for more information:

www.thestoragebed.com

www.georgethorntonart.com

photo 2

Great Skylines: London and New York

photo‘Chrysler Building’  by Alicia Dubnyckyj
Gloss on Wood
Dimensions: 30″ x 23″
Price: £2,500

Modern impressionism, This beautiful original brings to life New York at night in a way that no other artist is quite able to recreate.

The Gallery is off to the Hamptons Art Fair in July and to celebrate we thought we would have a look at the developing skylines of two iconic cities.

(Have a peak what’s going on here www.arthamptons.com)

Since New Amsterdam became New York in 1664, constant change and development has been its driving force. Today, it is America’s densest urban environment and most vital city, boasting one of the most recognizable skylines in the world.

The towering blocks of steel and glass are the attraction of thousands of visitors to the city each year and the focus of many artists each trying to represent their interpretation of the cities aura, personality and all encompassing energy.

London settled by the Romans in 43 AD has undergone constant change and still today is ever evolving.

Its iconic skyline wouldn’t be the same without its many spires and famed domed cathedral of St. Pauls designed by Christopher Wren, views of which are fiercely protected to maintain the type of skyline captured by Canaletto in the 18th century.

Nottinghill low‘Nottinghill Pastels’ by Rachel Tighe
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 36″ x 48″
Price: £1,750

Rachel Tighe, dubbed the modern Lowry. Her work brings together a  unique illustrative technique blended with graphical design processes and infused with a strong sense of colour

Nowadays the city becoming better known for its ultra modern skyscrapers such as Norman Foster’s Gherkin and most recently Renzo Piano’s, Shard at London Bridge.

Arguably this is creating a cityscape that looks no different to that of other cities, but in my opinion this is no bad thing. Both London and New York have become global powerhouses, epicentres of commerce, culture and politics and if we were to restrict this natural evolution of the city they run the risk of stagnating, becoming glorified museum pieces that are unable to flourish and break into the new world.

Both cities inspire and draw us in, it isn’t hard to see why so many artists are compelled to paint cityscapes across the world and why so many want these scenes hanging in our homes.

Featured below are some examples of famous cityscapes from around the world for you to enjoy:

Ambrogio-Lorenzetti-City-by-the-Sea

 Ambrogio Lorenzetti: City by the Sea (c.1335)

canaletto-the-thames-and-the-city
Canaletto: The Thames and the City, 1746

george-bellows-new-york
George Bellows
: New York, 1911

1913_chagall_paris
Marc Chagall
: Paris through the window, 1913

1943_mondrian_broadway
Piet Mondrian
: Broadway Boogie Woogie, 1942-43

Fresh New Artwork in for June

 We’ve got some brilliant new pieces of art coming in for you this coming month from artists such as Kate Brinkworth, Jan Nelson, Ed Chapman and Lawrie Williamson.

Take a peek at the images featured below and if you would like more information on any of the works shown please do not hesitate to contact the gallery. Don’t forget that there is also more from each artist and others at our website.

www.georgethorntonart.com

Image

‘An End’ by Kate Brinkworth
Dimensions: 32″ x 21.5″
Oil on Board
Price: £3,000 or spread the payment over 10,12 or 18 months (interest free), enquire for more details.

Kate working in mono tone has tried to portray a narrative of ‘Old London Town’. The sinister alleyways’ of Whitechapel and glory days of gangster Britain.

Incredible detail is poured onto board with Kate’s ability to work on the curtain cord and reflection upon the revolver. Each inch of detail is meticulously thought through and executed with breath taking results.

ImageImage

‘The Writer’ and ‘The Post’ by Kate Brinkworth
Dimensions: 13″ x 11.5″
Solar Plate Etchings, edition of 10
Price: £200 each or spread the payment over 10 months, just £20 a month (interest free).

There are a series of 6 solar plate etchings available each in an edition of 10.
Buy the complete set of 6 for just £1,000
Contact us via e-mail or pop into the gallery to view all 6 pieces –

george@georgethorntonart.com

These etchings scratched into copper plate are created using from her own photography. Ink is then applied to the plate and transferred to paper. This is a new experimental venture by the artist; the results echo her original pieces and make affordable, but well formed editions to any collections.

Image

‘Brisk Winds’ by Jan Nelson
Dimensions: 32″ x 32″
Oil on Canvas
£995 or spread the payment over 10 months, just £99.50 (interest free)

This is one for all those sailing fans our there. Nelson,a sailor herself really captures the emotions and rush you get out on the open waves.

Image

‘Bob Marley’ by Ed Chapman
Dimensions: 31″ x 48″
Broken Vinyl Record Mosaic on Board
£10,000 or spread the payment over 10,12 or 18 months (interest free), enquire for more details.

One of only 10 Vinyl creations ever made by Ed Chapman. This iconic piece brings a fresh perspective to an already renowned iconic image.

Image

‘Ovaltiney’ by Lawrie Williamson
24″ x 27″
Oil on Canvas
£6,750 or spread the payment over 10,12 or 18 months (interest free), enquire for more details.

Based upon the theme from the Radio Luxembourg show ‘The Ovaltineys’, originally aired in the 1950’s. Lawrie was a young man, however this song stayed with him and several years later whilst painting work surrounding nostalgia he was inspired by this song and thus this piece took shape.

‘Weird Science’ an Exhibition by Gail Troth Opens Tomorrow.

Image

Exhibition: Saturday 29th March – Friday 4th March
Opening Reception: Saturday 29th March: Meet the artist 1pm – 4pm

 

It’s almost here, the Gail Troth Exhibition opens it doors tomorrow.

Make sure you drop by the gallery, enjoy a glass of wine, some nibbles and of course get the chance to meet the artist herself who will be here from 1 – 4pm.

See work from over 5 of her different collections, featuring her popular ‘Eternal Landscape’ series and works never seen in Nottingham before.

This is a fantastic opportunity as Gail Troth rarely makes a public appearances and to have her in gallery tomorrow will be a huge pleasure. So come along and do not miss out!!!!

If you have any further questions or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 29th March please do not hesitate to contact the gallery.

Image

Upcoming Exhibition: ‘Weird Science’ By Gail Troth Paintings that Paint Themselves

Billion Year Old Carbon 121 x 76‘Billion Year Old Carbon’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 47.5″ x 30″
£1,695 or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

George Thornton Art would like to cordially invite you to the opening of our upcoming exhibition of the fantastic Gail Troth

Exhibition: Saturday 29th March – Friday 4th March
Opening Reception: Saturday 29th March: Meet the artist 1pm – 4pm

‘Weird Science’ will be a show displaying the various sides of Troth, bringing together examples from six of the artists collections including works from the popular eternal landscape range. This reflective exhibition aims to share the scope and diversity of Troth’s work, showing just how much can be achieved using her unique and experimental painting technique.

In order to create her works, Troth adds a variety of thinners and alcohol to acrylic and oil paints changing the mass density of the paint. This mass is changed continuously during each paintings creation.

Using these altered paints she constructs her images using a drip paint technique: Dropping paint onto a fluid canvas, forming concentric circles as it hits the surface. As the paintings dry, they create a delicate pattern beyond manual dexterity, which have an intriguing effect on the canvas.

For those already familiar Troth’s work this will be a fantastic opportunity to meet the artist herself. Troth will in the gallery from 1pm until 4pm on Saturday 29th March. This will be rare chance to meet her as she does not usually choose to publicly attend her exhibitions. Don’t miss out.

Please have a look at some of the featured work that will be on display above and below.

If you have any further questions or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 29th March please do not hesitate to contact the gallery.

Mutual Gravity NY Night 90cmx90cm‘New York Night’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Cedella's Son 101x101‘Cedella’s Son’
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 40″
£1,950 or available or pay through own art, pay just £195 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Mutual Gravity Times Square 90cmx 90cm‘New York Times Square’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

EL 10-451 100x50‘Surreal View’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 20″
£995 or available or pay through own art, pay just £995 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Featured Works for February

DSCF3922‘Aryton Senna’ by Nikki Douthwaite
Original Artwork: Card and Paper (hole punch dots) onto board (framed)
Dimensions: 55″ x 46″
Price:£3250 or 16 monthly instalments of £203 (Interest Free)

Check out some of our new works in for February.

We have some great pieces in from Kate Brinkworth, Nick Holdsworth, Jan Nelson, Russell-Hatton and Nom Kinnear King.

Along with these fantastic artists, we would like to welcome aboard the amazing Nikki Douthwaite.
She has already built a name for herself in the driving world; featured on the Grand Prix 2013 round up show, she is now widely collected by people including big names such as Mclaren, Martin Brundle  and Jake Humphrey. Motorcar mad she uses paper dots collected from hole punchers to create intricately detailed portraits of drivers. (See Above)

Check out some of the images below and for more information please feel free to contact the gallery for more information.

KBR‘Oxford Circus’ by Kate Brinkworth
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 24″ x 36″
Price: £3500 or 10 monthly instalments of £350 (Interest Free)

Kate’s Work recently sold at Christies, beating the expected guide price.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/paintings/kate-brinkworth-tall-coke-5762480-details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=5762480&sid=305c8de3-efd0-4711-a0c1-bb148ca17f44

Marlena‘Marlena’ by Nick Holdworth
Original Artwork: Gloss on Wood(Framed)
Dimensions: 33″ x 26″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

Train of Thought‘Train of Thought’ by Ian Hodgson
Medium:Graphite on Paper
Dimensions:28″ x 22″
Price: £495 or 10 monthly instalments of £49.50 (Interest Free)

Like-it-too-much‘Like it too Much’ by Paul Lemmon
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: 32″ x 32″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

1779782_10153797658580078_1498353910_n‘Henrietta’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Pastel on Paper, Mounted and Framed
Dimensions: 25″ x 26″
Price: £945 or 10 monthly instalments of £94.50 (Interest Free)

This piece has taken many months to complete. After relocating from Brighton to Norfolk King was inspired by the provincial landscape, animals, birds as well as the seasonal harvest time flora and fauna. An idea that transpired into this beautiful creation.

The Simple Power of Black and White

bw-art

‘The Milliner’s Workshop’ by Pablo Picasso

What is it about monochrome? It never seems to go out of fashion, it never ages and it never fails to capture the imagination.

One of the best exhibitions I ever had the pleasure of visiting was the ‘Picasso Black and White’ held at the Guggenheim in New York back in November 2012.  The work was displayed beautifully and with the building itself a gleaming white edifice, contrasting elegantly alongside Picasso’s creations.

The one thing I can recall most clearly was an assertion made by the artist that colour weakens, Pablo Picasso purged it from his work in order to highlight the formal structure and autonomy of form inherent in his art.

It is perhaps this simplicity and clarity that draws the viewer in, offering an element of creativity to the viewer that may not other wise exist. There is an untapped excitement in the ability to add colours and fill spaces with the mind creating your own subjective meaning to each piece that would otherwise be coloured in for you.

It would not be unfair to say that as a result black and white pieces tend to have a timeless appeal that allow them to adapt to a changing world around them. fitting into new moulds whilst still resonating with a notion of the moment in which they were created to capture.

 Take a peak at some of the black and white pieces we have in the Gallery below for a little inspiration.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us  by phone 01159243555
Or online at www.georgethorntonart.com

 Shatter

‘Shatter’ by Ian Hodgson
Original Artwork: Graphite on paper (presented in a double mount with off white modern wooden frame)
Price: £695
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of £69.50.

Image

‘Graphite Fusion’ by Russell HattonOriginal Artwork: Spray paints on Aluminium
Price: £3,000
Spread the payment with Own Art over 10, 12 or 18 months (interest free)

Image

‘Man of the Match’ by Mackenzie Thorpe
Signed limited edition graphic on paper. Just 75 copies published worldwide!
Price: £650 (mounted and framed)
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £65

Image

‘A Kiss for the Future’ by Graham Cecil Rhodes
Original Artwork: Ink on paper, mounted and framed.
Price: £1,350
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £135

Image

‘The Loneliness of Jonas McGinley’ by Tom Mead
This particular piece is a website exclusive and will not be arriving in the gallery until March. If you’re interested in being one of the first to witness this new artist please contact the gallery.

EL 448 100cmx100cm‘Ethereal’ by Gail Troth
Original Artwork: Oil on  box canvas
Price: £1,295
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £129.50

An Audience With… Ian Hodgson

We’re delving a little deeper into the weird and wonderful mind of Ian Hodgson and finding out a bit more about the man behind the Charcoal faces. If you think of any more questions you would like to ask the artist please ask them in the comments below and we will get some answers to you.

Train of Thought‘Train of Thought’

Name?

Ian Hodgson

Lets start with a little ice breaker: What are you reading at the moment?

 I always have a book on the go but have just finished ‘The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry’ by Rachel Joyce. Very easy to read with it’s gentle humour and apparent lightness but is deceptive in its depth.

 Looking at memory, regret and trying to make up for past mistakes the reader is taken as a willing passenger on the journey.

What are you working on right now? Are you changing direction at all?

Along with the usual head/figure studies that I’m always experimenting with I’m also exploring a bit of landscape, in particular, my childhood stomping ground of the hills and moors above the Yorkshire village where I grew up. Using the occasional photo as reference but relying mainly on memory I’m trying to represent an emotional landscape rather than a direct representation of place. Its more of a slight stray from the path than a change in direction and whether the results of these delves into the undergrowth will become public remains to be seen but I’m enjoying indulging myself for the time being..

Who, or what is your greatest influence on your life and art?

Music has always been a source of inspiration to me, from pop to punk to electro and much in between, I need to have my sounds set up in my studio to work along to. I’m not sure if what I play directly influences what I produce but it remains a constant, multi-faceted companion. I’d have to say that ultimately though it has been my urge/need to draw that has been and continues to be the most powerful influence!

What drives you, gets you out of bed and inspires you to draw?

I find inspiration arrives during the drawing process. Its not always an easy ride, frustration and feelings of doubt about what you are doing are never too far away and when they do occasionally surface I find the only way to re-engage with work is to just make marks on paper until eventually the physical act of drawing re-ignites the imagination, images form and you’re back in the creative zone. Being immersed here can be demanding, exhilarating and rewarding and keeps you going back for more!

Icarus Wing 2‘Icarus Wings’

Can you explain a little about your extraordinary technique?

I have found that exploring and exploiting the qualities of graphite (I use blocks, powder and pencils) gives me a level of satisfaction I haven’t found with other mediums. I sometimes indent paper using embossing tools before rubbing graphite over the top – the indented line remains the same colour as the paper – and manipulate the graphite using erasers. I rub out, smudge, add more graphite, work back into the image and build up in layers. I enjoy contrasting sharp energetic lines with more fuzzy and loose areas, adding and removing graphite until I’m happy with the overall balance.

What are the major challenges you face as an artist?

I think a major challenge for me as an artist is how to make ends meet and it is incredibly easy to become disillusioned with the ups and downs of selling work. Trying to make work that has some sort of commercial appeal but retains personal integrity can be a tricky one but I feel that the work is far more interesting and engaging if you stick to your vision and don’t just try and emulate what appears fashionable or safe. Finding and refining your own voice and style is a never ending process but keeps your work unique and fresh. This inevitably makes producing work more rewarding but not always as easy to make a living from!

Who is your favourite artist at the moment?

I’m currently enjoying looking at the work of Nathan Ford, there’s a beauty and starkness to his work that I find quite haunting.I’d certainly pitch him as one to watch.

What’s your Life ambition?

As I’m in this art malarky for the long haul my main ambition is to be able to continue working until I drop at a very old age! Within this time I want to build on what I’ve learnt and produce work that continues to surprise and excite me and hopefully connects with others.

Whats next?

I want to create some figurative pieces on blackboards as a way of almost reversing how I work. I’ve toyed with this approach before so the seed has already been planted but it would be good to develop this into producing more finished pieces. Watch this space…

Thank you for this incredible insight into what moves and motivates you. Inspiring stuff!

Originals are available in the gallery. View Ian’s work on line http://www.georgethorntonart.com/Artists/Ian-Hodgson/Art-By?pagesize=9

Or for the complete jaw dropping moments do pop in and see them in the flesh!

Urbanscope 2‘Urbanscope’