The British and our Love Affair with Modern Art

Post war artists were experimenting, frustrated by a global situation over which they had no control. The ability and need to answer questions and break rules had never been so prevalent and it was with this mind set that modern and therefore conceptual art was born. This movement created a trendy, cosmopolitan audience for contemporary modern art. A form that although at the time provided artist and dealers with incredible monetary gain,  at that time the idea of modern art was not exposed worldwide and certainly not enjoyed by all.

The problem with modern art is the same problem we all face when encountering something new, which is comprehension. It doesn’t matter if you are an art lover, creator or academic, if you don’t understand you tend to switch off. Now 50 years ago when Modern Art and by that I mean art of a conceptual nature i.e. ‘Pop Art’ or ‘Abstract’ was hitting the headlines in America the British were taking a stance of denial. In true British fashion we erred towards a conservative view of the movement – sticking to what we knew worked, sold and what we liked. Rapidly moving forward, Britain’s position on modern art has changed dramatically.  Possibly enhanced by dealers like Charles Saatchi and show rooms like the Tate we now find ourselves embracing the conceptual movement and providing platforms not only for some of the greatest known living artists but also those younger, emerging stars of the future. We host the Turner prize which, up until 1991 was deemed not important enough for the general public to understand, however, after a televised showing of the competition, it was soon understood that us Brits do love a bit of Modern Art. Maybe we have changed our psychology? Maybe we have changed our views, as internationally known artists born and bred in this country are now touted as legends of the  modern generation. Something to give us credence and an emblem to be proud of. Whatever the reason, fundamentally the British public have become a nation of modern art lovers. Embracing and showcasing our ideas to the world. This is certainly compounded by the huge spend and investment the government is now ploughing into projects such as the development of ‘Tate Modern’. A ‘Free Entrance’ art gallery which encourages art lovers from all over the world to enter and enjoy what us Brits deem fit to be considered modern art of international standards.

George Thornton Art prides itself on offering a range of art from different movements and we’d love to share our artists, modern, abstract or figurative with you.  Call in or call us – we have superlative art in an independent gallery.

atomised

“Atomised” by Russell Hatton

Industrial Spray Paints on Aluminum

Original Artwork

£3,950

 

mrgo-bang-gold-leafed-edition

“Bang” by MrGo

Signed limited edition, gold leaf hand embellished print on paper.

(Edition of 25)

£295 Framed.

 

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“Space Cadet” by Darren Fraser

Oil and Pencil on Box Canvas

Original Artwork

£1,750

 

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159243555

 

 

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Katy Jade Dobson. A touch of Monochrome?

What is it about monochrome? It never seems to go out of fashion, it never ages and it never fails to capture the imagination.

One of the best exhibitions I ever had the pleasure of visiting was the ‘Picasso Black and White’ held at the Guggenheim in New York back in November 2012.  The work was displayed beautifully and with the building itself a gleaming white edifice, contrasting elegantly alongside Picasso’s creations.

It is perhaps this simplicity and clarity that draws the viewer in, offering an element of creativity to the viewer that may not other wise exist. There is an untapped excitement in the ability to add colours and fill spaces with the mind creating your own subjective meaning to each piece that would otherwise be coloured in for you.

It would not be unfair to say that as a result black and white pieces tend to have a timeless appeal that allow them to adapt to a changing world around them. Fitting into new moulds whilst still resonating with a notion of the moment in which they were created to capture.

It is with this idea in mind we take a look at new work by the talented artist Katy Jade Dobson. A usual trait of this artist is to brush her canvas with colour however on this occasion she has purged her recognizable uses of reds, greens and purples from the art in order to highlight the formal structure and autonomy of form. An extremely difficult task as she works with a few base paints to create movement and life on to a static canvas or board. Although predominately black and white Dobson cannot resist a hue of colour to enhance the monochrome structure. Her ability to allow shadows to flow free is incandescent of her talent as an artist.

 

New works include ‘Harmony’, ‘Composure’ and ‘Dignity’.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us  by phone 01159243555
or view works online – Katy Jade Dobson

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

 

 

JJ Adams – Tattooed..

The gallery is proud to present exciting new art by this incredibly popular artist. Welcome back JJ Adams and his tattoo collection of works.

With a two year waiting list for an original commission, limited editions sell out within days, sometimes within a few hours of being released. Mr JJ Adams: a quiet unassuming provocateur of the contemporary art form creates interesting works! Here; the gallery has two new limited editions available. These new pieces have just been released by his Publishing house and we simply just love them!

JJ Adams - No Place Like Home B&W Tattoo Webfile

“No Place Like Home”
Black and White Edition (edition of 75)

Full of hidden gems, the artwork has the Classic and Iconic Judy Garland wearing her new Jimmy Choo’s, Tattoo’s referencing the Brain for the Scarecrow (E=Mc2), Poppy Tattoos for the Poppy field she fell asleep in, Courage tattoo on her hand for the Lion and piece of straw in her teeth for the Scarecrow as well

Medium: Signed limited edition of just 75
Framed dimensions 35’’ by 41’’
Price : £495
Own Art available; no deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £49.50

 

JJ Adams - Goblin King B&W Webfile

 

“The Goblin King”
Black and White edition (edition of 75)

As an acknowledgement of Bowies struggle with Cancer before his sad and premature passing this year we will be donating a percentage of  “The Goblin King” sales to the charity ‘British Live Trust’.

Medium: Signed limited edition of just 75
Framed dimensions 35’’ by 41’’
Price : £495
Own Art available; no deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £49.50

 

For more information do contact the gallery –

George Thornton Art
Unit 12A, Flying Horse walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN.
+44 (0)1159 243 555 –www.georgethorntonart.com

From time to time, Art faces controversy.

Dance with the Devil.jpg

 

Since humans began to make art, it has always been a creative form that is a hot bed of interpretation and criticism; from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ to Harvey’s infant portrait of ‘Myra Hindley’. So why the need to create controversy and, in this day and age when internet access has allowed images to be showcased on a grand and un-mediated scale, how controversial can or should we become? Granted Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 take on ‘Clockwork Orange’ clearly demonstrated his intention to shock the audience. Now, fast forward 35 years and the concept of shock horror is a widespread and regular occurrence. Now most artists don’t want to alienate future clients per se, but acknowledge that controversy is a fine mechanism to encourage people to talk about an artist or piece of artwork. The art industry like any other business thrives on PR and marketing. I suppose the fine line is to attempt to provoke a reaction but not one that goes far enough to put a buyer off of actually purchasing the piece. To stimulate debate and to make the audience feel something – anything is in the hands of the artist themselves and in their judgement and execution of their work .

In the democratic marketplace of ideas, controversy over a work of art can arise from different interpretations about the meaning of a work. It can arise from different perceptions of the context in which a work is presented. It can arise from where people find their comfort zone begins and ends.

Below are a number of pieces that.. let’s say err on the side of caution as opposed to provoke outright controversy.

 

JJ Adams - Zola  Psyche Webfile

‘Zola Psyche’

By JJ Adams
Signed limited edition on Paper
£495 (framed)

Coco de Mer

‘Coco de Mer’
By Xue Wang
Original Oil on Board
£4,950 (framed)

Own Art available. Purchase with an interest free loan. Contact us for details.

105 - 2013 SPLENDOR VERITATIS - La splendeur du vrai  2MB

‘Splendor Veritas’
By Joel Moens de Hase
Photographic Mosaic
£3,450

Own Art available. Purchase with an interest free loan. Contact us for details.

Thousands of images of undergarments create the ideal of a Nun.

Adam & Eve

‘Adam and Eve’
By Dean Kemp
Original Mixed Media Sculpture

New work by Dean arriving in March. Register your interest by contacting the gallery – george@georgethorntonart.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you again soon.

George Thornton Art

Unit 12A

Flying Horse Walk

Nottingham

NG1 2HN

01159 243 555

www.georgethorntonart.com

We’re Off to the Hamptons

June-2014newsletter

It won’t be long now until the gallery jets off to the Hamptons for the areas seminal art fair.

Now in its seventh successful year, ArtHamptons has established itself as the “must attend” art buying and social event of the Hamptons at the magnificent Sculpture Fields of Nova’s Ark.

Every year, the East End community comes together to celebrate the Hamptons’ long history as a haven for the creation and patronage of art.

George Thornton Art will be joining galleries from around the world.

Running from 10th-13th July 2014

The Gallery will closed between 5th July – 17th July  whilst we show our works.
If you have any queries or need to get in touch during that time, please email and I will do my utmost to get back to you.

Flatiron streets low‘Flatiron Streets’ by Rachel Tighe
Original Art: Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 48″ x 36″
Price: £1,750 $ 2,966

George Thornton Art is Pleased to Announce a New Partnership with Nottingham Based Company “The Storage Bed”

 photo 1

The Gallery is excited to announce a new partnership with ‘The Storage Bed’. Artworks by some of our amazing artists will be featured on their walls and we think its a perfect match.

It’ll be great to show our artists work in an arena that gives some contextual feeling to the pieces and is the perfect platform from which to introduce the gallery to people who may not otherwise have known about us.

Here at the gallery we only display the finest quality pieces, which have been painstakingly created to the highest quality. In this sense both the art on show and the beds on offer compliment the other beautifully, making this venture a perfect match for both companies.

“The Storage Bed” company based in Calverton, Nottingham design and produce high quality storage beds. Set up in 2007 by its founder David Norman, the company has gone from strength to strength and we are very happy to be working with another local business.The companies London Studio is open weekly and can be visited on an appointment only basis.

Have a look at our websites for more information:

www.thestoragebed.com

www.georgethorntonart.com

photo 2

Great Skylines: London and New York

photo‘Chrysler Building’  by Alicia Dubnyckyj
Gloss on Wood
Dimensions: 30″ x 23″
Price: £2,500

Modern impressionism, This beautiful original brings to life New York at night in a way that no other artist is quite able to recreate.

The Gallery is off to the Hamptons Art Fair in July and to celebrate we thought we would have a look at the developing skylines of two iconic cities.

(Have a peak what’s going on here www.arthamptons.com)

Since New Amsterdam became New York in 1664, constant change and development has been its driving force. Today, it is America’s densest urban environment and most vital city, boasting one of the most recognizable skylines in the world.

The towering blocks of steel and glass are the attraction of thousands of visitors to the city each year and the focus of many artists each trying to represent their interpretation of the cities aura, personality and all encompassing energy.

London settled by the Romans in 43 AD has undergone constant change and still today is ever evolving.

Its iconic skyline wouldn’t be the same without its many spires and famed domed cathedral of St. Pauls designed by Christopher Wren, views of which are fiercely protected to maintain the type of skyline captured by Canaletto in the 18th century.

Nottinghill low‘Nottinghill Pastels’ by Rachel Tighe
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 36″ x 48″
Price: £1,750

Rachel Tighe, dubbed the modern Lowry. Her work brings together a  unique illustrative technique blended with graphical design processes and infused with a strong sense of colour

Nowadays the city becoming better known for its ultra modern skyscrapers such as Norman Foster’s Gherkin and most recently Renzo Piano’s, Shard at London Bridge.

Arguably this is creating a cityscape that looks no different to that of other cities, but in my opinion this is no bad thing. Both London and New York have become global powerhouses, epicentres of commerce, culture and politics and if we were to restrict this natural evolution of the city they run the risk of stagnating, becoming glorified museum pieces that are unable to flourish and break into the new world.

Both cities inspire and draw us in, it isn’t hard to see why so many artists are compelled to paint cityscapes across the world and why so many want these scenes hanging in our homes.

Featured below are some examples of famous cityscapes from around the world for you to enjoy:

Ambrogio-Lorenzetti-City-by-the-Sea

 Ambrogio Lorenzetti: City by the Sea (c.1335)

canaletto-the-thames-and-the-city
Canaletto: The Thames and the City, 1746

george-bellows-new-york
George Bellows
: New York, 1911

1913_chagall_paris
Marc Chagall
: Paris through the window, 1913

1943_mondrian_broadway
Piet Mondrian
: Broadway Boogie Woogie, 1942-43