JJ Adams – Tattooed..

The gallery is proud to present exciting new art by this incredibly popular artist. Welcome back JJ Adams and his tattoo collection of works.

With a two year waiting list for an original commission, limited editions sell out within days, sometimes within a few hours of being released. Mr JJ Adams: a quiet unassuming provocateur of the contemporary art form creates interesting works! Here; the gallery has two new limited editions available. These new pieces have just been released by his Publishing house and we simply just love them!

JJ Adams - No Place Like Home B&W Tattoo Webfile

“No Place Like Home”
Black and White Edition (edition of 75)

Full of hidden gems, the artwork has the Classic and Iconic Judy Garland wearing her new Jimmy Choo’s, Tattoo’s referencing the Brain for the Scarecrow (E=Mc2), Poppy Tattoos for the Poppy field she fell asleep in, Courage tattoo on her hand for the Lion and piece of straw in her teeth for the Scarecrow as well

Medium: Signed limited edition of just 75
Framed dimensions 35’’ by 41’’
Price : £495
Own Art available; no deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £49.50

 

JJ Adams - Goblin King B&W Webfile

 

“The Goblin King”
Black and White edition (edition of 75)

As an acknowledgement of Bowies struggle with Cancer before his sad and premature passing this year we will be donating a percentage of  “The Goblin King” sales to the charity ‘British Live Trust’.

Medium: Signed limited edition of just 75
Framed dimensions 35’’ by 41’’
Price : £495
Own Art available; no deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £49.50

 

For more information do contact the gallery –

George Thornton Art
Unit 12A, Flying Horse walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN.
+44 (0)1159 243 555 –www.georgethorntonart.com
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The Art of Harry Bunce!

Harry Bunce has been billed as the painter to collect in the new millennium. New artist Bunce takes inspiration from our favourite woodland creatures. Rabbits, Foxes even Mice and gives them a modern twist. By reclaiming these icons and reinventing them, Harry’s work breathes new life into old friends and makes us regard them with fresh eyes. Cute? Maybe, but they’re rarely cuddly…

Below, please find the gallery preview to his collection. For further information contact us – george@georgethorntonart.com

Harry Bunce - Tommies - Web

“Tommies”
Signed limited edition screen print. Edition of 64.
Presented within a contemporary off white wooden frame.
Framed dimensions – 35″ x 27″
£420. Own Art available, No deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £42.00.

His works have been described variously as ‘Bucolic Street Art’ and ‘Potter meets Tarantino’ – a reclusive country cousin of the Bristol art scene..? Not really – Harry is hard to pigeon-hole, he lets his characters do the talking…

Harry Bunce - Fallen - Web

“Fallen” 
This piece has been shot with a 12 – guage shotgun to give the work a totally unique feel.

Signed limited edition screen print. Edition of 64.
Presented within a contemporary off white wooden frame.
Framed dimensions – 35″ x 27″
£420. Own Art available, No deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £42.00.

Harry Bunce - Homefront - Web

“Home Front”

Signed limited edition screen print. Edition of 64.

Framed dimensions – 27″ x 33″

£420. Own Art available, No deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £42.00.

Harry Bunce - Front Line - Web

“Front Line”
Signed limited edition screen print. Edition of 64.

Framed dimensions – 27″ x 33″

£420. Own Art available, No deposit followed by 10 monthly instalments of £42.00.

 

For further information contact us on
01159243555 : george@georgethorntonart.com

George Thornton Art

Unit 12A, Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

http://www.georgethorntonart.com

 

From time to time, Art faces controversy.

Dance with the Devil.jpg

 

Since humans began to make art, it has always been a creative form that is a hot bed of interpretation and criticism; from Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ to Harvey’s infant portrait of ‘Myra Hindley’. So why the need to create controversy and, in this day and age when internet access has allowed images to be showcased on a grand and un-mediated scale, how controversial can or should we become? Granted Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 take on ‘Clockwork Orange’ clearly demonstrated his intention to shock the audience. Now, fast forward 35 years and the concept of shock horror is a widespread and regular occurrence. Now most artists don’t want to alienate future clients per se, but acknowledge that controversy is a fine mechanism to encourage people to talk about an artist or piece of artwork. The art industry like any other business thrives on PR and marketing. I suppose the fine line is to attempt to provoke a reaction but not one that goes far enough to put a buyer off of actually purchasing the piece. To stimulate debate and to make the audience feel something – anything is in the hands of the artist themselves and in their judgement and execution of their work .

In the democratic marketplace of ideas, controversy over a work of art can arise from different interpretations about the meaning of a work. It can arise from different perceptions of the context in which a work is presented. It can arise from where people find their comfort zone begins and ends.

Below are a number of pieces that.. let’s say err on the side of caution as opposed to provoke outright controversy.

 

JJ Adams - Zola  Psyche Webfile

‘Zola Psyche’

By JJ Adams
Signed limited edition on Paper
£495 (framed)

Coco de Mer

‘Coco de Mer’
By Xue Wang
Original Oil on Board
£4,950 (framed)

Own Art available. Purchase with an interest free loan. Contact us for details.

105 - 2013 SPLENDOR VERITATIS - La splendeur du vrai  2MB

‘Splendor Veritas’
By Joel Moens de Hase
Photographic Mosaic
£3,450

Own Art available. Purchase with an interest free loan. Contact us for details.

Thousands of images of undergarments create the ideal of a Nun.

Adam & Eve

‘Adam and Eve’
By Dean Kemp
Original Mixed Media Sculpture

New work by Dean arriving in March. Register your interest by contacting the gallery – george@georgethorntonart.com

Thank you and we look forward to seeing you again soon.

George Thornton Art

Unit 12A

Flying Horse Walk

Nottingham

NG1 2HN

01159 243 555

www.georgethorntonart.com

Darren Fraser – Paintings of the Primate…

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‘The Apprentice’ by Darren Fraser

Drawing upon a dynamic and myriad pool of influences, Darren’s Expressionist work evokes disquieting subjects rendered feverishly as a means of confronting the realities of the modern age whilst exploring different aspects of the human condition. He is fascinated by the nature of personality and individuality.  He looks for and explores this in all of his works – of strangers, people in disguise, clowns and even apes.

Its Darren’s portrayal of everyday people whom he depicts as primates that fascinates me the most. Drawing upon his observation of relationships he encourages the viewer to remember that, within this modern age, we are (after all) the same and, that, no matter what we have achieved we should always remain grounded and remember where we came from.

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‘Me Time’ by Darren Fraser
Oil on Canvas

Throughout Darren’s art he vacillates between fluid and static, minimalist and expressionist, pristine and dirty. Exaggerated forms and intense colour gives him a distinct style which is slowly amassing critical acclaim and collectors nationwide.

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‘Day Dreamer’ by Darren Fraser
Oil on Canvas

Work by Darren Fraser on display in the gallery now.

George Thornton Art
12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN
Tel : 01159243555 E-mail : george@georgethorntonart.com

Harry Bunce, Suave Woodland Animals (new artist)

Harry Bunce - Faith Webfile

What comes to mind when you think of British woodland areas, The Animals of Farthing Wood, The Tales of Peter Rabbit, The Wind in the Willows? New artist Harry Bunce takes inspiration from our favourite creatures and gives them a modern twist.

Originally from Hampshire, Harry moved to Bristol to study and has hung around Somerset ever since; unfashionably honest he quotes Hockney, George Herriman and Beatrix Potter as influences.

His cast of cool, un-knowable, vaguely sinister anthropomorphic animals rest deep in our consciousness at a time when the only animals many of us see are urban foxes scrounging through bins.

Harry Bunce - Love is in the Air - London Webfile.jpg

‘Love in the Air’ Limited Edition on paper (framed) Edition of 33

By reclaiming these icons and reinventing them, Harry’s work breathes new life into old friends and makes us regard them with fresh eyes. Cute? Maybe, but they’re rarely cuddly: he has badgers carrying shotguns, red-jacketed foxes, anarchist hares and squirrels touting what look suspiciously like Walther PPKs.

The gallery is currently stocking four of Bunce’s Signed Limited Edition Prints – ‘Faith’, ‘Charity’, ‘Hope’ and ‘Love in the Air (London)’ that perfectly capture his wayward characters, each telling their own tale.

His works have been described variously as ‘Bucolic Street Art’ and ‘Potter meets Tarantino’ – a reclusive country cousin of the Bristol art scene..? Not really – Harry is hard to pigeon-hole, he lets his characters do the talking…

Harry Bunce - Charity Webfile.jpg

‘Charity’ Limited Edition on paper (framed) Edition of 45

Harry Bunce - Hope Webfile

‘Hope’ Limited Edition on paper (framed) Edition of 45

George Thornton Art

Unit 12A, Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN
Tel – 01159243555 : E.Mail – george@georgethorntonart.com

Modest Exhibition starts tomorrow, focusing on the work by Nottingham artist Christopher Green

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This coming week we are proud to focus on Nottingham artist Christopher Green and his collection of new work. Although Christopher has been painting all his life, mainly under a corporate, illustrative guise he has now broken through the fine art barrier and is receiving much wider recognition throughout the country.

Toy Town’ is a celebration of the classic model and cinematic indulgence that we all love, together with the beauty that hyperrealism can expose in the everyday of these objects. Lego figures and toy robots are put under a microscope, their details blown up to create monumental, bold and indulgent paintings that celebrate gaming and our childlike, enchanting imagination.

Exhibition –  27th June until 2nd July

For further information do call the gallery – 01159243555

camo trooper1

Camo Trooper (Lego)

Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£2,500
Own Art – Spread the payment over 10, 12 or 18 months with an interest free loan.

iron man1

Iron Man : Head Study

Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£995
No deposit, followed by 10 equal monthly instalments of £99.50.

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Robot – 7

Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£2,500
Own Art – Spread the payment over 10, 12 or 18 months with an interest free loan.

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Darth Vader

Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£2,500
Own Art – Spread the payment over 10, 12 or 18 months with an interest free loan.

Exhibition – 27th June until 2nd July

George Thornton Art, Unit 12a, Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

The Importance of Art

gallery 5George Thornton Art, Nottingham

An auction of contemporary art at Sothebys this week provoked some thought about how an artist, or even a piece of art gets classed as ‘important’ and actually what this means to the art buying audience. The auction at Sothebys was described as ‘a considered selection of artworks from Post-War innovators through to a new generation of artists working today.’ Prices ranged from thousands to hundreds of thousands of pounds, and many of the pieces auctioned sold for well in excess of their estimate, some reaching fifty percent in excess of the upper limit. None of the artists included in the sale were the superstars of the modern art world – no Koontz, Haring or Rothko – and yet those included were described as ‘important’ – and this seems to be the factor that pushed so many of the prices achieved above the upper estimate price.

Sothebys

Taking a look at some of the works sold, mostly abstract, modern works in this instance, I got to thinking about how the art buying public might possibly be persuaded or influenced to buy ‘important’ works. Discussion in the gallery on this topic centred on the reasons why people buy art. Three main answers to that – because the audience like a piece; because the audience has a ‘space’ that a piece of art fits into; because the audience views art as part of their investment strategy. And we agreed that it is the latter that is the most likely reason a buyer would be influenced by a view from someone in authority – like an art auction house or a dealer – whose opinion they trust. Fair enough, but would the first two reasons for buying art not be arguably more compelling? Buying art as investment, especially as part of a strategy for use of one’s investment funds, is fraught with risk and potentially could lead to disastrous consequences. One can only wonder what the collectors of Rolf Harris’ work are feeling in the light of recent events for example, and if pieces are being purchased only for their perceived value designated thus by ‘experts’ do the investing audience actually LIKE what they’re buying? Or are they just going on trend or analysis and not caring about the aesthetic value of the art they are buying. I would argue that it’s more important to actually own pieces of art that evoke a response in the audience, that fill a space in the collector’s heart, and not in their investment strategy. One may or may not end up with a piece of work that increases in financial value but the buyer who purchases pieces that provoke a feeling, or a way of seeing something differently, is intrinsically more valuable to the owner and the asset has more value than can simply be measured in financial terms.

Clearly I’m biased, but our customer base is one that values the intelligent, affordable art that we offer. Frequent introductions of new artists of interest, and operating totally independently the Gallery offers a refreshing art buying experience, one based on helping you find the pieces that you will love and cherish, regardless…

Below is a little flavour of what to expect from George Thornton Art.

Just DesertsSweet Desserts by Xue Wang. Original Oil on Board

EL 10-442 100x76cm

Meadow Lane by Gail Troth. Original Acrylic on Canvas

Heading down to the Line

Heading Down to the Line by Jan Nelson. Original Acrylic on Canvas

Bold & Beautiful web file

Bold and Beautiful by Dean Fox. Signed limited edition of just 45 copies on paper.

16b

Barn Owl by Stephen Rautenbach. Original Bronze sculpture