Upcoming Exhibition: ‘Weird Science’ By Gail Troth Paintings that Paint Themselves

Billion Year Old Carbon 121 x 76‘Billion Year Old Carbon’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 47.5″ x 30″
£1,695 or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

George Thornton Art would like to cordially invite you to the opening of our upcoming exhibition of the fantastic Gail Troth

Exhibition: Saturday 29th March – Friday 4th March
Opening Reception: Saturday 29th March: Meet the artist 1pm – 4pm

‘Weird Science’ will be a show displaying the various sides of Troth, bringing together examples from six of the artists collections including works from the popular eternal landscape range. This reflective exhibition aims to share the scope and diversity of Troth’s work, showing just how much can be achieved using her unique and experimental painting technique.

In order to create her works, Troth adds a variety of thinners and alcohol to acrylic and oil paints changing the mass density of the paint. This mass is changed continuously during each paintings creation.

Using these altered paints she constructs her images using a drip paint technique: Dropping paint onto a fluid canvas, forming concentric circles as it hits the surface. As the paintings dry, they create a delicate pattern beyond manual dexterity, which have an intriguing effect on the canvas.

For those already familiar Troth’s work this will be a fantastic opportunity to meet the artist herself. Troth will in the gallery from 1pm until 4pm on Saturday 29th March. This will be rare chance to meet her as she does not usually choose to publicly attend her exhibitions. Don’t miss out.

Please have a look at some of the featured work that will be on display above and below.

If you have any further questions or would like to register your interest in coming on Saturday 29th March please do not hesitate to contact the gallery.

Mutual Gravity NY Night 90cmx90cm‘New York Night’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Cedella's Son 101x101‘Cedella’s Son’
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 40″
£1,950 or available or pay through own art, pay just £195 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

Mutual Gravity Times Square 90cmx 90cm‘New York Times Square’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 35.5″ x 35.5″
£1,695 or available or pay through own art, pay just £169.50 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

EL 10-451 100x50‘Surreal View’
Acrylic on Canvas
Dimensions: 40″ x 20″
£995 or available or pay through own art, pay just £995 over ten monthly installments (interest free)

New Artist: Sara-Jane Szikora

From Friday (14 March), The Gallery is proud to welcome the return of Sarah Jane Szikora and her ‘sweet-shop style’ art back to Nottingham.

Sarah-Jane is a partially sighted leading artist who’s quirky and niche work depicts imaginary worlds and outrageously exaggerated figures – in this case, enormously fat, rather benign-looking characters with tiny heads.

Sarah-Jane has been compared to the late great painter Beryl Cook, but her characters are more concerned with food – cream cakes, battenbergs, sugar mice and her iconic gingerbread men, who frequently feature in her compositions.

Sarah is a leading niche artist hugely recognisable for her quirky and humorous take on the human condition and everyday life.

I have known Sarah for many years, and her detail is incredible – however, it’s her humorous and sometimes sarcastic take on everything around us that I find most satisfying. I challenge even the sternest individual not to break into a smile when viewing her paintings.

She has a huge following and has been eagerly anticipated by the city’s art lovers so I’m really excited to be able to show her work in my gallery.

Szikora’s work has been displayed in galleries across the UK and overseas as well as in major London shows – and reproduced as limited edition prints, sculpture, Royal Worcester ceramic ware and much more.

Take a look at the Szikora’s work below and if you would like any further information or see close up images of the works if you can’t make it in gallery then please do not hesitate to contact myself or Daniel at the Gallery.

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“Taking the Waters”
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: W: 42″ H: 60″
Price: £5,500 Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10 or 12 or 18 months (Interest free)

This particular piece is a snapshot of a natural bathing house in Szikora’s fathers native Hungary that she likes to visit whenever she’s in Budapest.

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“Tutti Frutti”
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: W: 42″ H: 52″
Price: £4,500 Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10, 12 or 18 months (Interest free)

Szikora’s life long dream is to one day open her very own Ice-Cream Parlour. This particular piece of work is how the artist envisages her own parlour would look right down to the black and white tiles and ice cream cone lighting ornaments.

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“Damien’s Dress”
Signed Limited Edition: Giclee Print (Artists Proof Edition of 5)
Dimensions: W: 24″ H: 24″
Price: £395 or spread the payment over 10 installments, just £39.50 a month

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“Blushin Dolls”
Signed Limited Edition: Giclee Print (Edition of 5)
Dimensions: W: 18″ H: 13″
Price: £295 or spread the payment over 10 installments, just £29.50 a month

From Dust to Rust: The Beauty of Decay

detroit1The Michigan Central Station, Detroit

Whether capturing in oil the crumbling remains of Tintern Abbey in 1794, maintaining the chaotic atmosphere of a stately home frozen in the 1950’s, regenerating a failed utopian experiment in Sheffield or witnessing the city wide decay of Detroit. There is an undeniable draw and intrigue surrounding the decline and decay of these once great landmarks.

These fallen symbols are perhaps so appealing because of the way they eloquently capture the passage of time, an intangible yet very present symbol of the human life-cycle. They draw us in and make us question the ways in which we view the world today and how we examine our collective history. This is by no means a new phenomenon, artists and others have viewed such ruin; Turner and other Romantics spent much of their time in the late eighteenth century visiting such sites and longing for a return to a golden age of Medieval England, just as the country began to feel the bite of the Industrial Revolution.

Ruins of West Front, Tintern Abbey circa 1794-5 by Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775-1851“Ruins of West Front, Tintern Abbey” by J. M. W. Turner (1794-5)

It has became inevitable that certain landmarks that are now so engrained and celebrated within the rich fabric of our lives be preserved, if not restored. Few could imagine a country void of country houses and ancient castles, institutions that faced extinction following World War II, but saved largely thanks to organisations such as The National Trust. These houses for the best part are preserved during their nineteenth century heydays, although in the case of Calke Abbey this is turned very much on its head. Here the idea of decay is very much celebrated; embodying a time machine like quality that marks the houses fall from grace.

824%2F28%2FSir+Vauncy%27s+Bedroom+-+John+Parkinson+_thumb_460x0%2C0An Un-Stately Home, Calke Abbey (Derbyshire)

Not all however are deemed worthy of preservation. The argument to preserve or not preserve can have profound effects and raise passionate argument. One of the most contentious contemporary issues is what to do with old Nazi monuments and relics. Should we leave them to rot and slide slowly into the past or preserve them in order to educate and allow them to stand as a warning to future generations? What to do with the Nazi rally grounds in Nuremberg, Germany is a highly publicised example of this argument; some want it left untouched, others want it destroyed entirely and others want it preserving. Such passions bring to light the enduring effect ruins can have on the people they touch and society as a whole.

Our interest in ruins is not just about a celebratory obsession, but a remembrance of the past, celebrating creativity and mourning of a time gone by, lost but not forgotten.  A standing testament that encapsulates: Not only design and taste, but social thought and the cultural ideals that effects our very understanding of today’s world.

New Artists: Stephen Rautenbach

Stephen Rautenbach is a South African bronze sculptor, we first met a few years ago whilst stomping around Stellenbosch and he quickly got me into one of his studios. I immediately fell in love with his work, the immaculate detailing of each bronze piece is just mind blowing! He really brings the animals to life both in the way the sculptures look and feel, highly textured you can almost sense the movement of the animals coat and the roughness of the ground on which they stand.

  He has built up quite the reputation in South Africa, not just creating bronzing, but also teaching his skill to others. We are very excited to be have his works in Gallery and we hope you like it to.

Check out some of his pieces below and if you would like any further information please do not hesitate to contact myself or Daniel at the Gallery.

20b‘Kingfisher in Flight’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: 20″ H: 5.5″ D: 3.5″
Price: £2650 [Available on Own Art, 10 monthly instalments of just £265 (Interest free)]

This majestic kingfisher sculpture really captures the speed and movement of the bird. It would like stunning upon any mantle or side board. It could even work as an interactive centrepiece allowing you to display light bites on special occasions.

Sprinting Hare‘Sprinting Hare’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: 8″ H: 10″ D: 8″
Price: £3500 [Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10 or 12 months (Interest free)]

The sprinting hare is my personal favourite of Rautenbach’s pieces. You can feel the hares energy and concentration as it thrusts itself forward. A truly inspirational and fascinating piece to view

16b‘Barn Owl’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: 10″ H: 17″ D: 6″
Price: £4100 [Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10 or 12 months (Interest free)]

This beautiful crafted work stands to attention, looking pleasantly regal. You can imagine it peering out from its elevated perch, looking for its next catch.

Tall Tail‘Tall Tail’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: ” H: ” D: ”
Price: £5950 [Available on Own Art, spread the payment over 10 or 12 months (Interest free)]

111‘Africaan Bull’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: 3″ H: 3″ D: 1.5″
Price: £295 [Available on Own Art, 10 monthly instalments of just £29.50 (Interest free)]

114‘Standing Shrew’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, 2 available)
Dimensions: W: 1.5″ H: 4″ D: 0.5″
Price: £250 [Available on Own Art, 10 monthly instalments of just £25 (Interest free)]

117‘Hiding Hedgehog’
Original Sculpture: Bronze (Edition of 15, only 1 available)
Dimensions: W: 2.5″ H: 2″ D: 2″
Price: £495 [Available on Own Art, 10 monthly instalments of just £49.50 (Interest free)]

Featured Works for February

DSCF3922‘Aryton Senna’ by Nikki Douthwaite
Original Artwork: Card and Paper (hole punch dots) onto board (framed)
Dimensions: 55″ x 46″
Price:£3250 or 16 monthly instalments of £203 (Interest Free)

Check out some of our new works in for February.

We have some great pieces in from Kate Brinkworth, Nick Holdsworth, Jan Nelson, Russell-Hatton and Nom Kinnear King.

Along with these fantastic artists, we would like to welcome aboard the amazing Nikki Douthwaite.
She has already built a name for herself in the driving world; featured on the Grand Prix 2013 round up show, she is now widely collected by people including big names such as Mclaren, Martin Brundle  and Jake Humphrey. Motorcar mad she uses paper dots collected from hole punchers to create intricately detailed portraits of drivers. (See Above)

Check out some of the images below and for more information please feel free to contact the gallery for more information.

KBR‘Oxford Circus’ by Kate Brinkworth
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 24″ x 36″
Price: £3500 or 10 monthly instalments of £350 (Interest Free)

Kate’s Work recently sold at Christies, beating the expected guide price.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/paintings/kate-brinkworth-tall-coke-5762480-details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=5762480&sid=305c8de3-efd0-4711-a0c1-bb148ca17f44

Marlena‘Marlena’ by Nick Holdworth
Original Artwork: Gloss on Wood(Framed)
Dimensions: 33″ x 26″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

Train of Thought‘Train of Thought’ by Ian Hodgson
Medium:Graphite on Paper
Dimensions:28″ x 22″
Price: £495 or 10 monthly instalments of £49.50 (Interest Free)

Like-it-too-much‘Like it too Much’ by Paul Lemmon
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: 32″ x 32″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

1779782_10153797658580078_1498353910_n‘Henrietta’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Pastel on Paper, Mounted and Framed
Dimensions: 25″ x 26″
Price: £945 or 10 monthly instalments of £94.50 (Interest Free)

This piece has taken many months to complete. After relocating from Brighton to Norfolk King was inspired by the provincial landscape, animals, birds as well as the seasonal harvest time flora and fauna. An idea that transpired into this beautiful creation.

The Simple Power of Black and White

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‘The Milliner’s Workshop’ by Pablo Picasso

What is it about monochrome? It never seems to go out of fashion, it never ages and it never fails to capture the imagination.

One of the best exhibitions I ever had the pleasure of visiting was the ‘Picasso Black and White’ held at the Guggenheim in New York back in November 2012.  The work was displayed beautifully and with the building itself a gleaming white edifice, contrasting elegantly alongside Picasso’s creations.

The one thing I can recall most clearly was an assertion made by the artist that colour weakens, Pablo Picasso purged it from his work in order to highlight the formal structure and autonomy of form inherent in his art.

It is perhaps this simplicity and clarity that draws the viewer in, offering an element of creativity to the viewer that may not other wise exist. There is an untapped excitement in the ability to add colours and fill spaces with the mind creating your own subjective meaning to each piece that would otherwise be coloured in for you.

It would not be unfair to say that as a result black and white pieces tend to have a timeless appeal that allow them to adapt to a changing world around them. fitting into new moulds whilst still resonating with a notion of the moment in which they were created to capture.

 Take a peak at some of the black and white pieces we have in the Gallery below for a little inspiration.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us  by phone 01159243555
Or online at www.georgethorntonart.com

 Shatter

‘Shatter’ by Ian Hodgson
Original Artwork: Graphite on paper (presented in a double mount with off white modern wooden frame)
Price: £695
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of £69.50.

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‘Graphite Fusion’ by Russell HattonOriginal Artwork: Spray paints on Aluminium
Price: £3,000
Spread the payment with Own Art over 10, 12 or 18 months (interest free)

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‘Man of the Match’ by Mackenzie Thorpe
Signed limited edition graphic on paper. Just 75 copies published worldwide!
Price: £650 (mounted and framed)
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £65

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‘A Kiss for the Future’ by Graham Cecil Rhodes
Original Artwork: Ink on paper, mounted and framed.
Price: £1,350
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £135

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‘The Loneliness of Jonas McGinley’ by Tom Mead
This particular piece is a website exclusive and will not be arriving in the gallery until March. If you’re interested in being one of the first to witness this new artist please contact the gallery.

EL 448 100cmx100cm‘Ethereal’ by Gail Troth
Original Artwork: Oil on  box canvas
Price: £1,295
No deposit, 10 equal monthly instalments of just £129.50

An Audience With… Ian Hodgson

We’re delving a little deeper into the weird and wonderful mind of Ian Hodgson and finding out a bit more about the man behind the Charcoal faces. If you think of any more questions you would like to ask the artist please ask them in the comments below and we will get some answers to you.

Train of Thought‘Train of Thought’

Name?

Ian Hodgson

Lets start with a little ice breaker: What are you reading at the moment?

 I always have a book on the go but have just finished ‘The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry’ by Rachel Joyce. Very easy to read with it’s gentle humour and apparent lightness but is deceptive in its depth.

 Looking at memory, regret and trying to make up for past mistakes the reader is taken as a willing passenger on the journey.

What are you working on right now? Are you changing direction at all?

Along with the usual head/figure studies that I’m always experimenting with I’m also exploring a bit of landscape, in particular, my childhood stomping ground of the hills and moors above the Yorkshire village where I grew up. Using the occasional photo as reference but relying mainly on memory I’m trying to represent an emotional landscape rather than a direct representation of place. Its more of a slight stray from the path than a change in direction and whether the results of these delves into the undergrowth will become public remains to be seen but I’m enjoying indulging myself for the time being..

Who, or what is your greatest influence on your life and art?

Music has always been a source of inspiration to me, from pop to punk to electro and much in between, I need to have my sounds set up in my studio to work along to. I’m not sure if what I play directly influences what I produce but it remains a constant, multi-faceted companion. I’d have to say that ultimately though it has been my urge/need to draw that has been and continues to be the most powerful influence!

What drives you, gets you out of bed and inspires you to draw?

I find inspiration arrives during the drawing process. Its not always an easy ride, frustration and feelings of doubt about what you are doing are never too far away and when they do occasionally surface I find the only way to re-engage with work is to just make marks on paper until eventually the physical act of drawing re-ignites the imagination, images form and you’re back in the creative zone. Being immersed here can be demanding, exhilarating and rewarding and keeps you going back for more!

Icarus Wing 2‘Icarus Wings’

Can you explain a little about your extraordinary technique?

I have found that exploring and exploiting the qualities of graphite (I use blocks, powder and pencils) gives me a level of satisfaction I haven’t found with other mediums. I sometimes indent paper using embossing tools before rubbing graphite over the top – the indented line remains the same colour as the paper – and manipulate the graphite using erasers. I rub out, smudge, add more graphite, work back into the image and build up in layers. I enjoy contrasting sharp energetic lines with more fuzzy and loose areas, adding and removing graphite until I’m happy with the overall balance.

What are the major challenges you face as an artist?

I think a major challenge for me as an artist is how to make ends meet and it is incredibly easy to become disillusioned with the ups and downs of selling work. Trying to make work that has some sort of commercial appeal but retains personal integrity can be a tricky one but I feel that the work is far more interesting and engaging if you stick to your vision and don’t just try and emulate what appears fashionable or safe. Finding and refining your own voice and style is a never ending process but keeps your work unique and fresh. This inevitably makes producing work more rewarding but not always as easy to make a living from!

Who is your favourite artist at the moment?

I’m currently enjoying looking at the work of Nathan Ford, there’s a beauty and starkness to his work that I find quite haunting.I’d certainly pitch him as one to watch.

What’s your Life ambition?

As I’m in this art malarky for the long haul my main ambition is to be able to continue working until I drop at a very old age! Within this time I want to build on what I’ve learnt and produce work that continues to surprise and excite me and hopefully connects with others.

Whats next?

I want to create some figurative pieces on blackboards as a way of almost reversing how I work. I’ve toyed with this approach before so the seed has already been planted but it would be good to develop this into producing more finished pieces. Watch this space…

Thank you for this incredible insight into what moves and motivates you. Inspiring stuff!

Originals are available in the gallery. View Ian’s work on line http://www.georgethorntonart.com/Artists/Ian-Hodgson/Art-By?pagesize=9

Or for the complete jaw dropping moments do pop in and see them in the flesh!

Urbanscope 2‘Urbanscope’

Pop Art, Old and New

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‘Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?’ by Richard Hamilton
Hanging in the Kunsthalle Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Don’t forget that we have an amazing exhibition in Gallery this week starting tomorrow created by Villayat Sunkmanitu entitled ‘Intimacy With Plants’. The exhibition aims to raise awareness for those suffering with PTSD and shows how photography helped the artist overcome his own battle with the condition and what can be achieved without having to leave the space of your own garden. Villayat will be in Gallery tomorrow 1pm – 4pm.

We hope to see you there. Until then, please enjoy the creative blog written below talking about the resurgence of Pop Art in the art world.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact the Gallery.

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‘Marlena’ by Nick Holdsworth
Medium: Original Art: Hand Pulled Silkscreen, Stencil and Gloss Paint on Wood (Framed)
Dimensions: 33″ x 26″
Price: £995 or just 10 monthly instalments of just £99.50 (Interest Free)

We’ve all heard of it and we all probably have some idea what it’s all about. Made famous predominately by artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein in the 1960’s, it has in the last few years had something of a revival (if it ever really went away) thanks to a group of artists inspired by the movement.

The notion of Pop Art really got going in mid 1950’s Britain one of the earliest examples being Richard Hamilton’s collage entitled ‘Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?’ (Above) Pop Art blends different aspects of mass culture, such as advertising, comic books, packaging and mundane cultural objects.

The movement developed in two different strands, one from within Britain and the other from the USA. For British artists Pop Art was a matter of ideas fuelled by American popular culture viewed from afar, while the American artists were inspired by the experience of living within that culture creating two distinct looks either side of the Atlantic.

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‘Dancing Skull’ by Mike Edwards
Medium: Signed limited edition, hand finished screen print onto Paper (framed) Edition of 100
Dimensions: 29″ x 29″
Price: £495 or just 10 monthly instalments of just £49.50 (Interest Free)

As the movement developed American Pop Art became the dominant style and became something of a phenomenon, reaching its peak during the mid 1960’s. A gradual decline and move away from the style occurred after this feeding into new Post-Modern Art.

Pop Art has once again resurfaced although this time, the time is more reflective. It aims to both celebrate and criticise what was being created and how they were inspired. Using new contemporary methods and materials they are really rejuvenating an admired art movement into something new, fresh and relevant to today’s audiences.

Raising Awareness! Upcoming Exhibition: ‘Intimacy With Plants’ – Living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder by Villayat ‘Snow Moon Wolf ’ Sunkmanitu

Intimacy 3 Copyright Villayat Sunkmanitua_resize_resize_resize

The Gallery is proud to support and welcome photographer Villayat ‘Snow Moon Wolf’ Sunkmanitu, who will be exhibiting a selection of his works taken in the haven of his own back garden. A place to escape and to recovery from the difficulties of living with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the modern world. The Exhibition hopes to raise awareness for people living with the condition and to promote discussion in an area that is often swept under the carpet.

Two World Wars and numerous conflicts later, the condition once ignored and passed off as ‘Shell Shock’, is still much misunderstood.  It is only after recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan that the issue has once again started to hit a chord with British public.

Sunkmanitu, a former RAF police officer stationed in Northern Ireland during the mid 1980’s still suffers from the condition and has undergone varying  NHS treatments and other more unorthodox methods such as healing Earth Medicine prescribed by the Lakota Tribe of the Great Plains in North America. It was in the wilderness that he was able to photograph wolves, escape the rat race, feel at peace and finally find some control over PTSD.

Photography and Poetry are both forms of creative therapy that help to get to grips with PTSD. Both will be displayed alongside each other during the exhibition, each working in tandem to expose the torment, alienation and stigma Sunkmanitu feels and the journey he has taken to find internal peace within himself and with his condition.

“Sometimes people with mental health problems can find it extremely difficult to leave their homes.  The purpose of this particular exhibition is to show what you can do within the safety of your own garden.”

Villayat’s exhibition will be on available to view in gallery from 1st to 8th February 2014. Villayat himself will be in gallery on Saturday 1st February to discuss the work and talk a bit more about his experiences with PTSD. This modest exhibition will be only be on show for one week before it continues its tour of the UK.

For more information please feel free to contact the gallery by phone or email.

Hello 2014: The January Secret Sale

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It’s a fresh new year and we are getting very excited here at The Gallery. 2014 is going to be the year the gallery really begins to stretch her legs by hosting some amazing exhibitions, introducing some amazing new artists and having a visible presence at a number of national and international art-fairs.

To celebrate the gallery is happy to invite you to the January Secret Sale starting  Saturday 18th January. All pieces of art in Gallery will be 10% off until the start of February. It’s just our little way of saying thank you for all of your support in 2013.

Don’t miss this fantastic opportunity to get the artwork you’ve always wanted and brighten up your walls!

Take a look at our website for inspiration as all works featured on-line are in our sale. However to redeem the 10% discount works must be bought in Gallery or over the phone on 0115 924 3555, not via the website.

Check our some of the galleries newest works below.

For further information, please do no hesitate to pop in or contact the gallery either by phone or email.

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“Easy Rider” by Ed Chapman
Original Artwork: Ceramic Tile Mosaic Table
Dimensions: W:30″ x L:47″ x H:14″
Original Price: £4,950 Now: £4,455
Available on interest free credit over 10 monthly instalments of £445.50

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“Rioja” by Russell Hatton
Original Artwork: Candy and Xycralic on Aluminium
Dimensions: 33″ x 33″
Original Price: £2500 Now: £2250
Available on interest free credit over 10 monthly instalments of £225

Racing Ahead of the Fleet

“Racing Ahead of the Fleet” by Jan Nelson
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 41″ x 26″
Original Price: £995 Now: £895
Available on interest free credit over 10 monthly instalments of £89.50

Nom - Black Wood

“Black Wood” by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 23″ x 23″
Original Price: £995 Now: £895
Available on interest free credit over 10 monthly instalments of £89.50