What makes the artist JJ Adams so popular?

This exciting young artist is touted as being the Next Big Thing on the British art scene. With his challenge to the heart of British cultural values – members of the Royal family displayed with full sleeve tattoos, iconic buildings such as Buckingham Palace or the Palace of Westminster depicted defaced by graffiti, Adams strikes at the heart of our cultural consciousness with his work.

Harrods

‘Harrods’ by JJ Adams

In the same way that Banksy became the art world’s darling, filling the vacuum left by the end of the love affair with the YBAs, Adams is making a name for himself, aided by Wishbone Publishing, with his phenomenal output. Born in Plymouth, Adams was raised in South Africa, remaining there until the end of the apartheid era when he returned to these shores with the aim of becoming a tattoo artist. Little wonder then that his obsession with body art spills over into his work, evidenced in his ‘Tattoo Series’ where icons of royalty, music and the silver screen are depicted with awesome full sleeve and knuckle tattoos. The ubiquity of the tattoo in mainstream culture must play a part in his appeal to the mainstream art audience, but there is more to his art than purely capitalising on a social trend. His interest in printing and in graphic design – honed when working in the South West as a printer whilst experimenting with art in his spare time – are evident in the stylised way much of his work is presented. Combining media such as printing, collage, spray paint, screen prints and hand painted acrylics, his work has attracted attention from Christie’s, Rolls Royce, Vogue and GQ magazines with its rawness, energy and passion, but also with its accessibility and broad subject appeal.

But, like Banksy, Adams is certainly not a mainstream fine artist, and similarly, much of his work remains true to the roots of his style and influences. Where Banksy’s popularity came from the street through recognition of his graffiti and its subsequent elevation to ‘art’, Adams work is equally accessible and most importantly recognisable in its representation of things ‘normal’ that have been given Adams’ treatment which, in challenging their orthodoxy, cause the audience to consider their own response to these significant cultural icons. However, being able to picture ‘Harrods’ department store with graffitied windows and point of sale, somehow appeals to the British sense of humour and perhaps more importantly makes the audience question why the imagery is such a visual shock. To have the artistic vision to produce works that speaks on such an accessible level to the man / woman in the street and yet which so cleverly strikes at the heart of our culture is evidence of Adams’ skill and gives a big clue as to why his work is generating such excitement in the art – and wider – community. Fundamentally this is what makes JJ Adams so popular and undeniably an artist to invest in!

Wonder Woman - Colour

‘Wonder Woman’ by JJ Adams

 

Sonic Vs Mario

‘Sonic Vs Mario’ by JJ Adams

Collection available within our Nottingham Gallery

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

Tel : 01159243555 ~ Email : george@georgethorntonart.com

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Featured Works for February

DSCF3922‘Aryton Senna’ by Nikki Douthwaite
Original Artwork: Card and Paper (hole punch dots) onto board (framed)
Dimensions: 55″ x 46″
Price:£3250 or 16 monthly instalments of £203 (Interest Free)

Check out some of our new works in for February.

We have some great pieces in from Kate Brinkworth, Nick Holdsworth, Jan Nelson, Russell-Hatton and Nom Kinnear King.

Along with these fantastic artists, we would like to welcome aboard the amazing Nikki Douthwaite.
She has already built a name for herself in the driving world; featured on the Grand Prix 2013 round up show, she is now widely collected by people including big names such as Mclaren, Martin Brundle  and Jake Humphrey. Motorcar mad she uses paper dots collected from hole punchers to create intricately detailed portraits of drivers. (See Above)

Check out some of the images below and for more information please feel free to contact the gallery for more information.

KBR‘Oxford Circus’ by Kate Brinkworth
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
Dimensions: 24″ x 36″
Price: £3500 or 10 monthly instalments of £350 (Interest Free)

Kate’s Work recently sold at Christies, beating the expected guide price.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinder/paintings/kate-brinkworth-tall-coke-5762480-details.aspx?from=salesummary&intObjectID=5762480&sid=305c8de3-efd0-4711-a0c1-bb148ca17f44

Marlena‘Marlena’ by Nick Holdworth
Original Artwork: Gloss on Wood(Framed)
Dimensions: 33″ x 26″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

Train of Thought‘Train of Thought’ by Ian Hodgson
Medium:Graphite on Paper
Dimensions:28″ x 22″
Price: £495 or 10 monthly instalments of £49.50 (Interest Free)

Like-it-too-much‘Like it too Much’ by Paul Lemmon
Original Artwork: Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: 32″ x 32″
Price: £995 or 10 monthly instalments of £99.50 (Interest Free)

1779782_10153797658580078_1498353910_n‘Henrietta’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Pastel on Paper, Mounted and Framed
Dimensions: 25″ x 26″
Price: £945 or 10 monthly instalments of £94.50 (Interest Free)

This piece has taken many months to complete. After relocating from Brighton to Norfolk King was inspired by the provincial landscape, animals, birds as well as the seasonal harvest time flora and fauna. An idea that transpired into this beautiful creation.

Pop Art, Old and New

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‘Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?’ by Richard Hamilton
Hanging in the Kunsthalle Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Don’t forget that we have an amazing exhibition in Gallery this week starting tomorrow created by Villayat Sunkmanitu entitled ‘Intimacy With Plants’. The exhibition aims to raise awareness for those suffering with PTSD and shows how photography helped the artist overcome his own battle with the condition and what can be achieved without having to leave the space of your own garden. Villayat will be in Gallery tomorrow 1pm – 4pm.

We hope to see you there. Until then, please enjoy the creative blog written below talking about the resurgence of Pop Art in the art world.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact the Gallery.

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‘Marlena’ by Nick Holdsworth
Medium: Original Art: Hand Pulled Silkscreen, Stencil and Gloss Paint on Wood (Framed)
Dimensions: 33″ x 26″
Price: £995 or just 10 monthly instalments of just £99.50 (Interest Free)

We’ve all heard of it and we all probably have some idea what it’s all about. Made famous predominately by artists such as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein in the 1960’s, it has in the last few years had something of a revival (if it ever really went away) thanks to a group of artists inspired by the movement.

The notion of Pop Art really got going in mid 1950’s Britain one of the earliest examples being Richard Hamilton’s collage entitled ‘Just What Is It That Makes Today’s Homes So Different, So Appealing?’ (Above) Pop Art blends different aspects of mass culture, such as advertising, comic books, packaging and mundane cultural objects.

The movement developed in two different strands, one from within Britain and the other from the USA. For British artists Pop Art was a matter of ideas fuelled by American popular culture viewed from afar, while the American artists were inspired by the experience of living within that culture creating two distinct looks either side of the Atlantic.

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‘Dancing Skull’ by Mike Edwards
Medium: Signed limited edition, hand finished screen print onto Paper (framed) Edition of 100
Dimensions: 29″ x 29″
Price: £495 or just 10 monthly instalments of just £49.50 (Interest Free)

As the movement developed American Pop Art became the dominant style and became something of a phenomenon, reaching its peak during the mid 1960’s. A gradual decline and move away from the style occurred after this feeding into new Post-Modern Art.

Pop Art has once again resurfaced although this time, the time is more reflective. It aims to both celebrate and criticise what was being created and how they were inspired. Using new contemporary methods and materials they are really rejuvenating an admired art movement into something new, fresh and relevant to today’s audiences.

Music in Art

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‘Blustery Daze’ by Nom Kinnear King
Original Artwork: Oil on Board
£995 or just £99.50 a month over 10 months (interest free)

It’s often said that a picture contains a thousand words, and it’s true that when looking at a piece the viewer is able to pick out and extrapolate themes and narratives that could perhaps not have been so perfectly expressed with the written word.

Can the same be said for music though? We know the sounds of our favourite tunes and instruments, but it can often be difficult to capture its essence within imagery. The act of listening is perhaps too abstract, preventing painters to fully express music onto canvas.

There are however famous examples of works that do just this. One example may be William Holman Hunt’s, ‘The Awakening Conscience’ picture below.

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Here we see a kept Victorian mistress raising from the lap of her married lover having realised the “error of her ways” the image evokes a sense of salvation and hope, but also contains a musical quality. Almost like the backing score to a film, a sense of sound circulates in this image with the sound of image, notice the man’s thumb either compressing or depressing on the piano key. Running alongside this is the idea that her awakening is actually an aftermath of the music played on the piano.

While some painting will contain literal musical connotations like the two above, we must as well not overlook the importance the colour plays. It has been suggested that for many certain sounds conjure up different colours, a D sharp for example could cause the listener to visualise red and because of this the individual would relate the sound to paintings in the same colour. Therefore, different people would have varying musical experience when viewing the same piece regardless of the imagery used within the painting itself.

Other pictures may even really on a particular icon or familiar image to invoke a certain sound or group of songs much like the image of Madonna featured below.

The presence of music within art can often be overlooked and it may be worth taking time out when viewing an image to feel for any music within the piece, not all images will have any, but the ones that do will heighten the experience of viewing artwork and perhaps bring about a new way to look at art.

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‘Madonna’ by Nick Holdsworth
Original Artwork: Pixelated Screen print and Spray-paint onto paper (framed)
£895 or 10 monthly instalments of just £89.50 (Interest free)