Size matters…

What do we think about buying that piece of art? More specifically what do we think about large statement pieces? Bringing a statement artwork into your home isn’t as daunting as you may think… It has the potential to change your living environment with monumental impact and inspire you to think around further inter design projects within your home or office. It doesn’t have to be that piece which ‘just fills the space…’ Having a statement piece not only finishes off a room design but also shows off your personality and tastes. Depending upon colour and content it has the potential to change your mood and energy.

As we move ever closer to spring and with an element of warmth in the air we have chosen 10 large, vibrant, statement artworks from our portfolio of emerging and established artists

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‘Evolution’ by Kirsty Mackay

Beautiful abstract, this work comes presented within a modern, white wooden frame.

 

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‘Moss’ by Nick Holdsworth

Original artwork, Spray painted on pixelated paper. Mounted and framed within a gloss white modern frame.

 

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‘Me Time’ by Darren Fraser

Straight from the artist studio. This piece is unframed, paint still wet but ready to hang!

 

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‘A Full Fleet Start’ by Jan Nelson

Full of energy, Jan Nelsons love of the sea brings energy and life to her work. This piece is beautifully presented within a large white wooden frame and measures 172cm in width by 100 in height.

 

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‘A Walk to Big Ben’ by Rachel Tighe

By utilizing her background within an illustration industry, Rachel’s execution of the work is impeccable!

 

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‘Atomised in Blue’ by Russell Hatton

30 years in the making… this incredible artist has honed his skills by using industrial paint and transformed the way we view abstract art!

 

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‘Ludgate Hill’ by Alicia Dubnyckyj

Alicia Dubnycykj is an exciting artist who brings a sense of the speed and vibrance of her chosen cities to stunning life on her large boards.

‘Bettie Page’ by JJ Adams

This original to the sold out signed limited edition is available via appointment within our gallery. A piece of much content, box canvas, framed within a black modern frame and reaching almost 6ft in height.

 

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‘Bettie Page’ by JJ Adams

This original to the sold out signed limited edition is available via appointment within our gallery. A piece of much content, box canvas, framed within a black modern frame and reaching almost 6ft in height.

 

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‘Its Elvis F**king Presley’s Gun’ by Russell Marshal

The birth of cool. This lovely silkscreen packs a punch!

 

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‘Superwoman’ by Joel Moens de Hase

1000’s of tiny images meticulouslky placed to create one life size image.

For all these works and others view online or visit our Nottingham gallery.

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

Tel – 01159243555

 

The Price of Art. What’s it worth…?

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So last year a consortium spent $28million on a Pablo Picasso. The year previously an online client spent $15million on a Hopper which was purchased without the buyer even viewing the original… So where does this shortfall of economic gain and price induced art begin and who is to blame? Certainly the auction houses predominantly control the art market pricing structure, something perhaps relating to their high flying Chinese and Middle Eastern client base. Then to be honest the Cork street galleries have no compunction about plucking a figure out of thin air and placing it on a piece of art. Often not even highlighting the price, with the understanding if you have to ask… you can’t afford it.

Although having always been a luxury item, the nature and extent of art has changed dramatically over the past few decades. David Zwirner asked “Why do we pay so much for Art?” This is quite a poignant question, with so many other things urgently requiring capital why is so much money plunged into the art market?

The price of art is booming and the game played by auction houses now seems to be one of merely asking “which record can we break next?” Great for investors and sellers, but it doesn’t really capture the real essence of art, and threatens to cheapen the cultural impact of the work. With that in mind I would like to take a look at a modest number of artworks from our gallery that are absolutely not expensive, and definitely not priced for London, but showing them on this platform perhaps gives you the opportunity to peacefully contemplate the value of art to the consumer who is buying it for the pure pleasure of the piece.

 

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‘David Bowie’ by Ed Chapman

Original Mosaic created entirely from smashed vinyl records.

Price – £10,000

An artist of distinct ability. The incredible detail speaks volumes and what is potentially a modest figure for a piece that takes well over a month to complete. Ed latest original of Queen Elizabeth II sold from an astonishing £26,000 at auction and with commissions and collectors from prestigious Universities to the Beckham’s his work is certainly in demand.

 

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“Zen Lepidoptera” by Christopher Green

Oil on Board

Price – £4,000

Where to start with this Nottingham artist. An artist that has no worthy seller catalogue. An artist that has merely dipped his only tentatively dipped brushes (so to speak) in the gallery world, however we are now looking at piece of magnificent proportion. A hand painted ‘Buddha’. 122cm in height by 90cm in width. Painted with no audio aid. A piece that has taken 6 weeks to complete. If we take into consideration man hours as well as a procured skill which many of us do not own this is a mere snippet at £4,000.

 

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“Atomised” by Russell Hatton

Industrial Spray paint on Aluminum

Priced at £3,950

Russell spent 30 years perfecting the art of painting on mental sheets. A technique of ground breaking proportion I do believe there is no artist in this country or possibly the world that can replicate his technique. His ability to control paint, create something beautiful and master a piece that can only be described in short as ‘Integrity’. A work of art that won’t fade after time, can withstand the elements including direct sunlight. A work that is so translucent and vibrant and cannot be replicated within any other medium is outstanding. Worthy of a much more inflated price tag I believe, a fact that has certainly proved correct over the past few years.

To conclude Here in the gallery we look to take London art out of the London market without stipulating the London art market pricing structure. Our prices are set on secondary market sales, artists cost and fluctuating trends and fashions, a set of practices that in my mind should be independently regulated. The works above may seem ‘Pricey’ but in my opinion justified based upon skills set and longevity of style.

Kind Regards,

George Thornton Art

12a Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – Tel – 01159243555

 

The British and our Love Affair with Modern Art

Post war artists were experimenting, frustrated by a global situation over which they had no control. The ability and need to answer questions and break rules had never been so prevalent and it was with this mind set that modern and therefore conceptual art was born. This movement created a trendy, cosmopolitan audience for contemporary modern art. A form that although at the time provided artist and dealers with incredible monetary gain,  at that time the idea of modern art was not exposed worldwide and certainly not enjoyed by all.

The problem with modern art is the same problem we all face when encountering something new, which is comprehension. It doesn’t matter if you are an art lover, creator or academic, if you don’t understand you tend to switch off. Now 50 years ago when Modern Art and by that I mean art of a conceptual nature i.e. ‘Pop Art’ or ‘Abstract’ was hitting the headlines in America the British were taking a stance of denial. In true British fashion we erred towards a conservative view of the movement – sticking to what we knew worked, sold and what we liked. Rapidly moving forward, Britain’s position on modern art has changed dramatically.  Possibly enhanced by dealers like Charles Saatchi and show rooms like the Tate we now find ourselves embracing the conceptual movement and providing platforms not only for some of the greatest known living artists but also those younger, emerging stars of the future. We host the Turner prize which, up until 1991 was deemed not important enough for the general public to understand, however, after a televised showing of the competition, it was soon understood that us Brits do love a bit of Modern Art. Maybe we have changed our psychology? Maybe we have changed our views, as internationally known artists born and bred in this country are now touted as legends of the  modern generation. Something to give us credence and an emblem to be proud of. Whatever the reason, fundamentally the British public have become a nation of modern art lovers. Embracing and showcasing our ideas to the world. This is certainly compounded by the huge spend and investment the government is now ploughing into projects such as the development of ‘Tate Modern’. A ‘Free Entrance’ art gallery which encourages art lovers from all over the world to enter and enjoy what us Brits deem fit to be considered modern art of international standards.

George Thornton Art prides itself on offering a range of art from different movements and we’d love to share our artists, modern, abstract or figurative with you.  Call in or call us – we have superlative art in an independent gallery.

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“Atomised” by Russell Hatton

Industrial Spray Paints on Aluminum

Original Artwork

£3,950

 

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“Bang” by MrGo

Signed limited edition, gold leaf hand embellished print on paper.

(Edition of 25)

£295 Framed.

 

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“Space Cadet” by Darren Fraser

Oil and Pencil on Box Canvas

Original Artwork

£1,750

 

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN – 01159243555

 

 

Katy Jade Dobson. A touch of Monochrome?

What is it about monochrome? It never seems to go out of fashion, it never ages and it never fails to capture the imagination.

One of the best exhibitions I ever had the pleasure of visiting was the ‘Picasso Black and White’ held at the Guggenheim in New York back in November 2012.  The work was displayed beautifully and with the building itself a gleaming white edifice, contrasting elegantly alongside Picasso’s creations.

It is perhaps this simplicity and clarity that draws the viewer in, offering an element of creativity to the viewer that may not other wise exist. There is an untapped excitement in the ability to add colours and fill spaces with the mind creating your own subjective meaning to each piece that would otherwise be coloured in for you.

It would not be unfair to say that as a result black and white pieces tend to have a timeless appeal that allow them to adapt to a changing world around them. Fitting into new moulds whilst still resonating with a notion of the moment in which they were created to capture.

It is with this idea in mind we take a look at new work by the talented artist Katy Jade Dobson. A usual trait of this artist is to brush her canvas with colour however on this occasion she has purged her recognizable uses of reds, greens and purples from the art in order to highlight the formal structure and autonomy of form. An extremely difficult task as she works with a few base paints to create movement and life on to a static canvas or board. Although predominately black and white Dobson cannot resist a hue of colour to enhance the monochrome structure. Her ability to allow shadows to flow free is incandescent of her talent as an artist.

 

New works include ‘Harmony’, ‘Composure’ and ‘Dignity’.

For more information please do not hesitate to contact us  by phone 01159243555
or view works online – Katy Jade Dobson

George Thornton Art

12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN

 

 

Stitched threads on Paper… Donna Rumble – Smith

Nottingham’s very own Donna Rumble – Smith plies her trade starting often with handwritten letters, poems, stories and thoughts of the past, the present and of the future. These ideas blend and evolve to create installations, artists books and wall pieces. Quite often the concept dictates what the work will become.

‘Piccadilly Memphis’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Donna’s work intends to capture special moments and reflections of conversations which are personal and intimate; about journeys and people.

Incorporated within the work Donna includes architecture allowing structured patterns to flow through the paper, giving a beautiful depiction of city living.

‘Bristol Harbourside’ – Original artwork: Stitched threads, acrylic and pencil over layered with poetry text, inked onto transparent paper

 

‘The Shard’ – Original artwork, stitched threads onto paper.

Art by Donna Rumble – Smith is on permanent display in our Nottingham gallery. We will also be exhibiting her work in Bristol for the Affordable Art Fair which runs 8th – 11th September. For tickets do contact the gallery  – 01159243555

 

George Thornton Art
12A Flying Horse Walk
Nottingham
NG1 2HN

E.Mail – george@georgethorntonart.com

Skin Deep. For the love of a Skull…

For centuries skull imagery was the main focus of mainstream artistic endeavor. Egyptians, Greeks and the Romans were famed for treasuring the skull and thus depictions of skinless facial features have been excavated for 1000s of years. By the 16th century skulls were becoming so central to European culture that, with a largely illiterate proletariat, depictions of skulls informed and educated as well as decorated.

So why do we love the skull? Well, certainly we can relate to one, after all we all have one, a shell structure that has evolved over millions of years which protects our most vital organ, exquisitely designed. However, the skull itself is far from a pretty object and why should it be..? Maybe it’s the fascination with its role in the human form as opposed to its aesthetic composition that is what fascinates us the most. At one point in art history all works of the skull were dark and macabre, possibly an insight into the harsh reality of living conditions in the Middle Ages. However, moving forward to the modern day, the skull is certainly an object of desire – the current love of skulls as a motif has never been so prevalent, guided by the some serious players in the world of fashion and art like the late Alexander McQueen and Damien Hirst.

Moving forward to the current time, skull imagery in art and its use as a device to engage the audience in the comfort of the familiar, whilst challenging perceptions, is a common occurrence.

From my point of view, as much as I love skull art, I do like my artists to push boundaries and try and incorporate an element of beauty within the work – and not just attempt to add commercial value to the commodity of their art. A juxtaposition (if you will) of showcasing something perceived as morbid and crossing this concept with elements of beauty. A selected number of my artists below have done just that using humour, flowers and even diamonds to not so subtly embellish an essentially macabre object associated with death and the human condition. I think they have achieved, each in their own way, a device to enable us to contemplate our respective fates in a surprising and strangely pleasurable way.

All works are on display in the gallery now.

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Mr Go : “Love you to Death”

Signed limited edition on paper, mounted and framed. (edition of 25)

£295

 

 

Christopher Green : “Red Bug”

Hyper Realism, Original Oil on Board

£2,500

 

Louise McNaught : “Born to Die”

Signed limited edition on paper. Edition of just 50 and presented within a black card mount and modern black matt frame.

£200 (unframed) or £350 (framed)

The gallery is showcasing this beautiful edition as well as the original painting entitled ‘Origin of Symmetry’

Magnus Gjoen : “Rose are Dead, (broken)”

Signed limited edition on paper. (edition of 50)  Presented within a card mount and modern black gloss frame.

£700 (unframed) or £835 (framed)

For all the updates follow the gallery on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Find us online or pop in and say hello!

Kind Regards,

George Thornton Art

The Art of MrGO

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MrGo is one of the prime practitioners with modern day, pop art themed graphics. Combining traditional sketch work with digital techniques, MrGo’s art contains humour and wit, often using word play or visual puns to communicate his point and entertain. While at first glance, MrGo appears to be bound to purely aesthetic in modernist discourse, references to consumerism are plentiful however it’s his apparent underline agenda that takes precedence. A wry humour flows through his portraits allowing the viewer to debate life, death, emotional consequence and acceptability.

Drawing on influences of photo-realism, graphic art & surrealism, the detail he manages to achieve within his work is impressive – most look like photographs. The guiding principles of his method are impulse and eclecticism. It’s only when you look closely you notice the hand developed details and quirks that embellish his digitally drawn subjects.

Celebrated works are now on display. The complete collection is available online, however to appreciate the inspiring details within the work do visit our Nottingham Gallery.

MrGo

“Love you to Death”
Signed limited edition to just 25 copies.
£295 framed. Presented within a slim off white card mount and modern black frame.

 

“Its for You”
Signed limited edition to just 45 copies.
£295 framed. Presented within a slim off white card mount and modern black frame.

 

“The Great Escape – Acquiesce”
Signed limited edition to just 45 copies.
£295 framed. Presented within a slim off white card mount and modern black frame.

View the full collection online or in our gallery

George Thornton Art
12A Flying Horse Walk, Nottingham, NG1 2HN
Tel : 01159243555 : george@georgethorntonart.com